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All-offspring dispersal in a tropical mammal with resource defense polygyny


Dechmann, Dina K N; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Kerth, Gerald (2007). All-offspring dispersal in a tropical mammal with resource defense polygyny. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 61(8):1219-1228.

Abstract

In polygynous mammals, males are usually responsible for gene flow while females are predominantly philopatric. However, there is evidence that in a few mammalian species female offspring may disperse to avoid breeding with their father when male tenure exceeds female age at maturity. We investigated offspring dispersal and local population structure in the Neotropical bat Lophostoma silvicolum. The mating system of this species is resource defense polygyny, with the resource being active termite nests, excavated by single males, which are then joined by females. We combined field observations of 14 harems during 3years and data about the genetic structure within and between these groups, calculated with one mitochondrial locus and nine nuclear microsatellite loci. The results show that both male and female offspring disperse before maturity. In addition, we estimated life span of excavated termite nests and the duration they were occupied by the same male. Our findings suggest that long male tenure of up to 30months is indeed a likely cause for the observed dispersal by female offspring that can reach maturity at a low age of 6months. We suggest that dispersal by offspring of both sexes may occur quite frequently in polygynous tropical bats and thus generally may be more common in mammals than previously assumed

Abstract

In polygynous mammals, males are usually responsible for gene flow while females are predominantly philopatric. However, there is evidence that in a few mammalian species female offspring may disperse to avoid breeding with their father when male tenure exceeds female age at maturity. We investigated offspring dispersal and local population structure in the Neotropical bat Lophostoma silvicolum. The mating system of this species is resource defense polygyny, with the resource being active termite nests, excavated by single males, which are then joined by females. We combined field observations of 14 harems during 3years and data about the genetic structure within and between these groups, calculated with one mitochondrial locus and nine nuclear microsatellite loci. The results show that both male and female offspring disperse before maturity. In addition, we estimated life span of excavated termite nests and the duration they were occupied by the same male. Our findings suggest that long male tenure of up to 30months is indeed a likely cause for the observed dispersal by female offspring that can reach maturity at a low age of 6months. We suggest that dispersal by offspring of both sexes may occur quite frequently in polygynous tropical bats and thus generally may be more common in mammals than previously assumed

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Life Sciences > Animal Science and Zoology
Language:English
Date:8 May 2007
Deposited On:29 Nov 2018 16:19
Last Modified:15 Apr 2021 14:52
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-5443
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-007-0352-z

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