Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Modulation of locomotor activity in complete spinal cord injury


Lünenburger, L; Bolliger, M; Czell, D; Müller, R; Dietz, V (2006). Modulation of locomotor activity in complete spinal cord injury. Experimental Brain Research, 174(4):638-646.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the modulation of muscle activity during locomotor-like movements by different walking speeds in subjects with a motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI) compared to actively- and passively-walking control subjects without neurological deficit. Stepping movements on a treadmill were induced and assisted by a driven gait orthosis. Electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of one leg (rectus and biceps femoris, tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius) was recorded and analyzed at three stepping velocities with similar body weight support in both subject groups. In SCI subjects, the EMG amplitude of biceps femoris, tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius was in general similar or weaker than in passively- and actively-stepping control subjects, but that of rectus femoris was larger. The degree of co-activation between tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius was higher in SCI than in control subjects. A significant velocity-dependent EMG modulation was present in all four-leg muscles in both subject groups. In SCI subjects, this EMG modulation was similar to that in actively stepping control subjects. It is concluded that in complete spastic SCI subjects, spinal neuronal circuits underlying locomotion can to a large extent adequately respond to a change in external drive to adapt the neuronal pattern to a new locomotion speed. The application of various speeds might enhance the effect of locomotor training in incomplete SCI subjects

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the modulation of muscle activity during locomotor-like movements by different walking speeds in subjects with a motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI) compared to actively- and passively-walking control subjects without neurological deficit. Stepping movements on a treadmill were induced and assisted by a driven gait orthosis. Electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of one leg (rectus and biceps femoris, tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius) was recorded and analyzed at three stepping velocities with similar body weight support in both subject groups. In SCI subjects, the EMG amplitude of biceps femoris, tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius was in general similar or weaker than in passively- and actively-stepping control subjects, but that of rectus femoris was larger. The degree of co-activation between tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius was higher in SCI than in control subjects. A significant velocity-dependent EMG modulation was present in all four-leg muscles in both subject groups. In SCI subjects, this EMG modulation was similar to that in actively stepping control subjects. It is concluded that in complete spastic SCI subjects, spinal neuronal circuits underlying locomotion can to a large extent adequately respond to a change in external drive to adapt the neuronal pattern to a new locomotion speed. The application of various speeds might enhance the effect of locomotor training in incomplete SCI subjects

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
27 citations in Web of Science®
33 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

53 downloads since deposited on 03 Dec 2018
47 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2 October 2006
Deposited On:03 Dec 2018 16:21
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:45
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0014-4819
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-006-0509-4
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicencespringer101007s0022100605094 (Library Catalogue)
PubMed ID:16761140

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Modulation of locomotor activity in complete spinal cord injury'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF (Nationallizenz 142-005)
Size: 350kB
View at publisher