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Psychosocial impact of living-related kidney transplantation on donors and partners


Neuhaus, Thomas J; Wartmann, Matthias; Weber, Markus; Landolt, Markus A; Laube, Guido F; Kemper, Markus J (2005). Psychosocial impact of living-related kidney transplantation on donors and partners. Pediatric Nephrology, 20(2):205-209.

Abstract

Living-related kidney transplantation (LRKT) is an option for children with end-stage renal failure. In addition to medical concerns, there is uncertainty about the psychological impact of living-related donation on parent donors and families. A survey was conducted on the decision making process and medical and psychosocial consequences of LRKT. Between 1992 and 1999, 20 parents donated a kidney for their child. A questionnaire including 24 items was sent to parent donors and their partners. Nineteen parents and partners responded; the median time after LRKT was 3years. Donors and partners reported an independent decision making process with no significant influence of partners, relatives, or hospital staff. Partners were more concerned about medical problems than donors themselves (P <0.02). Donors and partners cited no medical problems except sustained pain. Both reported an improved personal relationship towards the transplanted child. Donors and partners also cited an improved personal relationship. The vast majority (18/19) of couples still supported the decision for organ donation. In conclusion, there was a high degree of satisfaction with the decision making process in LRKT. The great majority of donors and partners did not report negative medical or psychological consequences. The relationship between donor, partner, and recipient child improved after LRKT

Abstract

Living-related kidney transplantation (LRKT) is an option for children with end-stage renal failure. In addition to medical concerns, there is uncertainty about the psychological impact of living-related donation on parent donors and families. A survey was conducted on the decision making process and medical and psychosocial consequences of LRKT. Between 1992 and 1999, 20 parents donated a kidney for their child. A questionnaire including 24 items was sent to parent donors and their partners. Nineteen parents and partners responded; the median time after LRKT was 3years. Donors and partners reported an independent decision making process with no significant influence of partners, relatives, or hospital staff. Partners were more concerned about medical problems than donors themselves (P <0.02). Donors and partners cited no medical problems except sustained pain. Both reported an improved personal relationship towards the transplanted child. Donors and partners also cited an improved personal relationship. The vast majority (18/19) of couples still supported the decision for organ donation. In conclusion, there was a high degree of satisfaction with the decision making process in LRKT. The great majority of donors and partners did not report negative medical or psychological consequences. The relationship between donor, partner, and recipient child improved after LRKT

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 February 2005
Deposited On:23 Oct 2018 16:02
Last Modified:28 Oct 2018 09:12
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0931-041X
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00467-004-1749-9
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicencespringer101007s0046700417499 (Library Catalogue)

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