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Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) quantify split solid objects


Cacchione, Trix; Hrubesch, Christine; Call, Josep (2013). Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) quantify split solid objects. Animal Cognition, 16(1):1-10.

Abstract

Recent research suggests that gorillas' and orangutans' object representations survive cohesion violations (e.g., a split of a solid object into two halves), but that their processing of quantities may be affected by them. We assessed chimpanzees' (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos' (Pan paniscus) reactions to various fission events in the same series of action tasks modelled after infant studies previously run on gorillas and orangutans (Cacchione and Call in Cognition 116:193-203, 2010b). Results showed that all four non-human great ape species managed to quantify split objects but that their performance varied as a function of the non-cohesiveness produced in the splitting event. Spatial ambiguity and shape invariance had the greatest impact on apes' ability to represent and quantify objects. Further, we observed species differences with gorillas performing lower than other species. Finally, we detected a substantial age effect, with ape infants below 6years of age being outperformed by both juvenile/adolescent and adult apes

Abstract

Recent research suggests that gorillas' and orangutans' object representations survive cohesion violations (e.g., a split of a solid object into two halves), but that their processing of quantities may be affected by them. We assessed chimpanzees' (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos' (Pan paniscus) reactions to various fission events in the same series of action tasks modelled after infant studies previously run on gorillas and orangutans (Cacchione and Call in Cognition 116:193-203, 2010b). Results showed that all four non-human great ape species managed to quantify split objects but that their performance varied as a function of the non-cohesiveness produced in the splitting event. Spatial ambiguity and shape invariance had the greatest impact on apes' ability to represent and quantify objects. Further, we observed species differences with gorillas performing lower than other species. Finally, we detected a substantial age effect, with ape infants below 6years of age being outperformed by both juvenile/adolescent and adult apes

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Social Sciences & Humanities > Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 January 2013
Deposited On:12 Dec 2018 18:30
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 02:41
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1435-9448
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-012-0545-3
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicencespringer101007s1007101205453 (Library Catalogue)
PubMed ID:22875724

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