Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Informal university technology transfer: a comparison between the United States and Germany


Grimpe, Christoph; Fier, Heide (2010). Informal university technology transfer: a comparison between the United States and Germany. Journal of Technology Transfer, 35(6):637-650.

Abstract

Existing literature has confined university technology transfer almost exclusively to formal mechanisms, like patents, licenses or royalty agreements. Relatively little is known about informal technology transfer that is based upon interactions between university scientists and industry personnel. Moreover, most studies are limited to the United States, where the Bayh-Dole Act has shaped the institutional environment since 1980. In this paper, we provide a comparative study between the United States and Germany where the equivalent of the Bayh-Dole Act has come into force only in 2002. Based on a sample of more than 800 university scientists, our results show similar relationships for the United States and Germany. Faculty quality which is however based on patent applications rather than publications serves as a major predictor for informal technology transfer activities. Hence, unless universities change their incentives (e.g., patenting as one criterion for promotion and tenure) knowledge will continue to flow out the backdoor

Abstract

Existing literature has confined university technology transfer almost exclusively to formal mechanisms, like patents, licenses or royalty agreements. Relatively little is known about informal technology transfer that is based upon interactions between university scientists and industry personnel. Moreover, most studies are limited to the United States, where the Bayh-Dole Act has shaped the institutional environment since 1980. In this paper, we provide a comparative study between the United States and Germany where the equivalent of the Bayh-Dole Act has come into force only in 2002. Based on a sample of more than 800 university scientists, our results show similar relationships for the United States and Germany. Faculty quality which is however based on patent applications rather than publications serves as a major predictor for informal technology transfer activities. Hence, unless universities change their incentives (e.g., patenting as one criterion for promotion and tenure) knowledge will continue to flow out the backdoor

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
72 citations in Web of Science®
86 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 17 Dec 2018
44 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:1 December 2010
Deposited On:17 Dec 2018 17:36
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:46
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0892-9912
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10961-009-9140-4
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicencespringer101007s1096100991404 (Library Catalogue)

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Informal university technology transfer: a comparison between the United States and Germany'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF (Nationallizenz 142-005)
Size: 183kB
View at publisher