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Emerging cell array based on reaction–diffusion


Miyashita, Shuhei; Murata, Satoshi (2007). Emerging cell array based on reaction–diffusion. Artificial Life and Robotics, 11(1):32-36.

Abstract

This article demonstrates the self-replication and self-organization phenomena based on a reaction-diffusion mechanism by computer simulation. The simulation model consists of a one-dimensional cell array. Each cell contains two kinds of chemical substances, activator u and inhibitor v, that can generate a reaction-diffusion wave, which is a spatial concentration pattern. The cells are supposed to be divided or deleted depending on the concentrations of chemical substances. We tried several kinds of diffusion coefficient in the model, and in some simulations, a self-replication process and a generating cell array with a metabolic process were observed. By applying the division rule and the apoptosis rule, cell arrays duplicate in two oscillating states, i.e., self-replication processes were observed. By applying a division rule and an annihilation rule, a cell array that has a stable length is generated by changing the cell components, i.e., generating a cell array by a metabolic process was observed. Surprisingly, these two phenomena are realized independently of the initial number of cells

Abstract

This article demonstrates the self-replication and self-organization phenomena based on a reaction-diffusion mechanism by computer simulation. The simulation model consists of a one-dimensional cell array. Each cell contains two kinds of chemical substances, activator u and inhibitor v, that can generate a reaction-diffusion wave, which is a spatial concentration pattern. The cells are supposed to be divided or deleted depending on the concentrations of chemical substances. We tried several kinds of diffusion coefficient in the model, and in some simulations, a self-replication process and a generating cell array with a metabolic process were observed. By applying the division rule and the apoptosis rule, cell arrays duplicate in two oscillating states, i.e., self-replication processes were observed. By applying a division rule and an annihilation rule, a cell array that has a stable length is generated by changing the cell components, i.e., generating a cell array by a metabolic process was observed. Surprisingly, these two phenomena are realized independently of the initial number of cells

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:English
Date:25 January 2007
Deposited On:19 Dec 2018 16:55
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:46
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1433-5298
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10015-006-0394-8
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicencespringer101007s1001500603948 (Library Catalogue)

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