Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Floral structure and systematics in four orders of rosids, including a broad survey of floral mucilage cells


Matthews, M L; Endress, P K (2006). Floral structure and systematics in four orders of rosids, including a broad survey of floral mucilage cells. Plant Systematics and Evolution, 260:199-221.

Abstract

Phylogenetic studies have greatly impacted upon the circumscription of taxa within the rosid clade, resulting in novel relationships at all systematic levels. In many cases the floral structure of these taxa has never been compared, and in some families, even studies of their floral structure are lacking. Over the past five years we have compared floral structure in both new and novel orders of rosids. Four orders have been investigated including Celastrales, Oxalidales, Cucurbitales and Crossosomatales, and in this paper we attempt to summarize the salient results from these studies. The clades best supported by floral structure are: in Celastrales, the enlarged Celastraceae and the sister relationship between Celastraceae and Parnassiaceae; in Oxalidales, the sister relationship between Oxalidaceae and Connaraceae, and Tremandraceae embedded in Elaeocarpaceae; in Cucurbitales, the sister relationship between Corynocarpaceae plus Coriariaceae, and the grouping of the core Cucurbitales (Cucurbitaceae, Begoniaceae, Tetramelaceae, Datiscaceae); in Crossosomatales, the sister relationship between Ixerbaceae plus Strasburgeriaceae, and between this clade and Geissolomataceae. The core Crossosomatales (Crossosomataceae, Stachyuraceae, Staphyleaceae) and Celastrales as an order are not strongly supported by floral structure. In addition, a new floral feature of potential systematic interest is assessed. Specifically the presence of special cells in flowers with a thickened mucilaginous inner cell wall and a distinct, remaining cytoplasm is surveyed in 88 families and 321 genera (349 species) of basal angiosperms and eudicots. These cells were found to be most common in rosids, particulary fabids (Malpighiales, Oxalidales, Fabales, Rosales, Fagales, Cucurbitales), but were also found in some malvids (Malvales). They are notably absent or rare in asterids (present in campanulids: Aquifoliales, Stemonuraceae) and do not appear to occur in other eudicot clades or in basal angiosperms. Within the flower they are primarily found in the abaxial epidermis of sepals

Abstract

Phylogenetic studies have greatly impacted upon the circumscription of taxa within the rosid clade, resulting in novel relationships at all systematic levels. In many cases the floral structure of these taxa has never been compared, and in some families, even studies of their floral structure are lacking. Over the past five years we have compared floral structure in both new and novel orders of rosids. Four orders have been investigated including Celastrales, Oxalidales, Cucurbitales and Crossosomatales, and in this paper we attempt to summarize the salient results from these studies. The clades best supported by floral structure are: in Celastrales, the enlarged Celastraceae and the sister relationship between Celastraceae and Parnassiaceae; in Oxalidales, the sister relationship between Oxalidaceae and Connaraceae, and Tremandraceae embedded in Elaeocarpaceae; in Cucurbitales, the sister relationship between Corynocarpaceae plus Coriariaceae, and the grouping of the core Cucurbitales (Cucurbitaceae, Begoniaceae, Tetramelaceae, Datiscaceae); in Crossosomatales, the sister relationship between Ixerbaceae plus Strasburgeriaceae, and between this clade and Geissolomataceae. The core Crossosomatales (Crossosomataceae, Stachyuraceae, Staphyleaceae) and Celastrales as an order are not strongly supported by floral structure. In addition, a new floral feature of potential systematic interest is assessed. Specifically the presence of special cells in flowers with a thickened mucilaginous inner cell wall and a distinct, remaining cytoplasm is surveyed in 88 families and 321 genera (349 species) of basal angiosperms and eudicots. These cells were found to be most common in rosids, particulary fabids (Malpighiales, Oxalidales, Fabales, Rosales, Fagales, Cucurbitales), but were also found in some malvids (Malvales). They are notably absent or rare in asterids (present in campanulids: Aquifoliales, Stemonuraceae) and do not appear to occur in other eudicot clades or in basal angiosperms. Within the flower they are primarily found in the abaxial epidermis of sepals

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
32 citations in Web of Science®
37 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

14 downloads since deposited on 03 Jul 2019
12 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Life Sciences > Plant Science
Language:English
Date:20 July 2006
Deposited On:03 Jul 2019 13:18
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 02:49
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0378-2697
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00606-006-0443-8
Related URLs:https://www.swissbib.ch/Search/Results?lookfor=nationallicencespringer101007s0060600604438 (Library Catalogue)

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Floral structure and systematics in four orders of rosids, including a broad survey of floral mucilage cells'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF (Nationallizenz 142-005)
Size: 331kB
View at publisher