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Shared and Disorder-Specific Event-Related Brain Oscillatory Markers of Attentional Dysfunction in ADHD and Bipolar Disorder


Michelini, Giorgia; Kitsune, Viryanaga; Vainieri, Isabella; Hosang, Georgina M; Brandeis, Daniel; Asherson, Philip; Kuntsi, Jonna (2018). Shared and Disorder-Specific Event-Related Brain Oscillatory Markers of Attentional Dysfunction in ADHD and Bipolar Disorder. Brain Topography, 31(4):672-689.

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and bipolar disorder (BD) often present with overlapping symptoms and cognitive impairments, such as increased fluctuations in attentional performance measured by increased reaction-time variability (RTV). We previously provided initial evidence of shared and distinct event-related potential (ERP) impairments in ADHD and BD in a direct electrophysiological comparison, but no study to date has compared neural mechanisms underlying attentional impairments with finer-grained brain oscillatory markers. Here, we aimed to compare the neural underpinnings of impaired attentional processes in ADHD and BD, by examining event-related brain oscillations during a reaction-time task under slow-unrewarded baseline and fast-incentive conditions. We measured cognitive performance, ERPs and brain-oscillatory modulations of power and phase variability in 20 women with ADHD, 20 women with BD (currently euthymic) and 20 control women. Compared to controls, both ADHD and BD groups showed increased RTV in the baseline condition and increased RTV, theta phase variability and lower contingent negative variation in the fast-incentive condition. Unlike controls, neither clinical group showed an improvement from the slow-unrewarded baseline to the fast-incentive condition in attentional P3 amplitude or alpha power suppression. Most impairments did not differ between the disorders, as only an adjustment in beta suppression between conditions (lower in the ADHD group) distinguished between the clinical groups. These findings suggest shared impairments in women with ADHD and BD in cognitive and neural variability, preparatory activity and inability to adjust attention allocation and activation. These overlapping impairments may represent shared neurobiological mechanisms of attentional dysfunction in ADHD and BD, and potentially underlie common symptoms in both disorders.

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and bipolar disorder (BD) often present with overlapping symptoms and cognitive impairments, such as increased fluctuations in attentional performance measured by increased reaction-time variability (RTV). We previously provided initial evidence of shared and distinct event-related potential (ERP) impairments in ADHD and BD in a direct electrophysiological comparison, but no study to date has compared neural mechanisms underlying attentional impairments with finer-grained brain oscillatory markers. Here, we aimed to compare the neural underpinnings of impaired attentional processes in ADHD and BD, by examining event-related brain oscillations during a reaction-time task under slow-unrewarded baseline and fast-incentive conditions. We measured cognitive performance, ERPs and brain-oscillatory modulations of power and phase variability in 20 women with ADHD, 20 women with BD (currently euthymic) and 20 control women. Compared to controls, both ADHD and BD groups showed increased RTV in the baseline condition and increased RTV, theta phase variability and lower contingent negative variation in the fast-incentive condition. Unlike controls, neither clinical group showed an improvement from the slow-unrewarded baseline to the fast-incentive condition in attentional P3 amplitude or alpha power suppression. Most impairments did not differ between the disorders, as only an adjustment in beta suppression between conditions (lower in the ADHD group) distinguished between the clinical groups. These findings suggest shared impairments in women with ADHD and BD in cognitive and neural variability, preparatory activity and inability to adjust attention allocation and activation. These overlapping impairments may represent shared neurobiological mechanisms of attentional dysfunction in ADHD and BD, and potentially underlie common symptoms in both disorders.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Anatomy
Health Sciences > Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
Health Sciences > Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Imaging
Life Sciences > Neurology
Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Language:English
Date:1 July 2018
Deposited On:25 Oct 2018 09:25
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 07:50
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0896-0267
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10548-018-0625-z
PubMed ID:29417321

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