Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Preliminary evidence for an increased likelihood of a stable trajectory in mild cognitive impairment in individuals with higher motivational abilities


Thoma, Myriam V; Forstmeier, Simon; Schmid, Roger; Kellner, Oliver; Xepapadakos, Franziskos; Gasser Schreiter, Ursula; Blessing, Andreas; Ropohl, Axel; Bieri-Brüning, Gabriela; Debeer, Dries; Maercker, Andreas (2018). Preliminary evidence for an increased likelihood of a stable trajectory in mild cognitive impairment in individuals with higher motivational abilities. BMC Geriatrics, 18(1):181.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Motivational abilities (MA), that describe skills in relation to goal-oriented behavior, have recently been found to be associated with neuropathological aging. Here we examine the impact of MA on the long-term course of mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

METHODS: We followed-up N = 64 individuals diagnosed with MCI (M = 73 years, 44% female) for 3 years. MA were assessed by long-term informants of the participants using two scales: motivation and decision regulation [Volitional Components Questionnaires, VCQ, (Kuhl and Fuhrmann, Decomposing self-regulation and self-control: the volitional components inventory, 1998)]. Cognitive abilities were assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination (J Psychiatr Res 12:189-98, 1975). Survival analyses and multilevel modeling (MLM) were applied to determine the predicting effect of informant-rated MA at baseline on the likelihood of MCI stability and on the trajectory of cognitive abilities.

RESULTS: Fifty percent (n = 32) of the MCI participants remained stable, while 32.8% (n = 21) and 17.2% (n = 11) converted to Alzheimer's disease (AD) or dropped-out, respectively. Survival analyses revealed that MCI cases with higher-rated MA at baseline were more likely to exert a stable course in MCI over 3 years (p = 0.036) when controlling for demographic characteristics and executive function. MLM analyses indicated that higher informant-rated MA at baseline were significantly related to higher cognitive abilities, even when controlling for MCI subtype (p = 0.030).

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides preliminary longitudinal evidence for a lower risk of conversion to AD and higher cognitive abilities by higher rated MA at an early stage of MCI.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Motivational abilities (MA), that describe skills in relation to goal-oriented behavior, have recently been found to be associated with neuropathological aging. Here we examine the impact of MA on the long-term course of mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

METHODS: We followed-up N = 64 individuals diagnosed with MCI (M = 73 years, 44% female) for 3 years. MA were assessed by long-term informants of the participants using two scales: motivation and decision regulation [Volitional Components Questionnaires, VCQ, (Kuhl and Fuhrmann, Decomposing self-regulation and self-control: the volitional components inventory, 1998)]. Cognitive abilities were assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination (J Psychiatr Res 12:189-98, 1975). Survival analyses and multilevel modeling (MLM) were applied to determine the predicting effect of informant-rated MA at baseline on the likelihood of MCI stability and on the trajectory of cognitive abilities.

RESULTS: Fifty percent (n = 32) of the MCI participants remained stable, while 32.8% (n = 21) and 17.2% (n = 11) converted to Alzheimer's disease (AD) or dropped-out, respectively. Survival analyses revealed that MCI cases with higher-rated MA at baseline were more likely to exert a stable course in MCI over 3 years (p = 0.036) when controlling for demographic characteristics and executive function. MLM analyses indicated that higher informant-rated MA at baseline were significantly related to higher cognitive abilities, even when controlling for MCI subtype (p = 0.030).

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides preliminary longitudinal evidence for a lower risk of conversion to AD and higher cognitive abilities by higher rated MA at an early stage of MCI.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

23 downloads since deposited on 09 Oct 2018
23 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:13 August 2018
Deposited On:09 Oct 2018 12:33
Last Modified:15 Feb 2019 15:29
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-2318
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-018-0865-5
PubMed ID:30103681
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100019_124535
  • : Project TitleMotivational Reserve as protective psychological factor in mild Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI)
  • : FunderVelux Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderTropos Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderKurt Fries Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderSwiss Alzheimer’s Association
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title

Download

Download PDF  'Preliminary evidence for an increased likelihood of a stable trajectory in mild cognitive impairment in individuals with higher motivational abilities'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 779kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)