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Preliminary evidence for an increased likelihood of a stable trajectory in mild cognitive impairment in individuals with higher motivational abilities


Thoma, Myriam V; Forstmeier, Simon; Schmid, Roger; Kellner, Oliver; Xepapadakos, Franziskos; Gasser Schreiter, Ursula; Blessing, Andreas; Ropohl, Axel; Bieri-Brüning, Gabriela; Debeer, Dries; Maercker, Andreas (2018). Preliminary evidence for an increased likelihood of a stable trajectory in mild cognitive impairment in individuals with higher motivational abilities. BMC Geriatrics, 18(1):181.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Motivational abilities (MA), that describe skills in relation to goal-oriented behavior, have recently been found to be associated with neuropathological aging. Here we examine the impact of MA on the long-term course of mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

METHODS: We followed-up N = 64 individuals diagnosed with MCI (M = 73 years, 44% female) for 3 years. MA were assessed by long-term informants of the participants using two scales: motivation and decision regulation [Volitional Components Questionnaires, VCQ, (Kuhl and Fuhrmann, Decomposing self-regulation and self-control: the volitional components inventory, 1998)]. Cognitive abilities were assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination (J Psychiatr Res 12:189-98, 1975). Survival analyses and multilevel modeling (MLM) were applied to determine the predicting effect of informant-rated MA at baseline on the likelihood of MCI stability and on the trajectory of cognitive abilities.

RESULTS: Fifty percent (n = 32) of the MCI participants remained stable, while 32.8% (n = 21) and 17.2% (n = 11) converted to Alzheimer's disease (AD) or dropped-out, respectively. Survival analyses revealed that MCI cases with higher-rated MA at baseline were more likely to exert a stable course in MCI over 3 years (p = 0.036) when controlling for demographic characteristics and executive function. MLM analyses indicated that higher informant-rated MA at baseline were significantly related to higher cognitive abilities, even when controlling for MCI subtype (p = 0.030).

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides preliminary longitudinal evidence for a lower risk of conversion to AD and higher cognitive abilities by higher rated MA at an early stage of MCI.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Motivational abilities (MA), that describe skills in relation to goal-oriented behavior, have recently been found to be associated with neuropathological aging. Here we examine the impact of MA on the long-term course of mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

METHODS: We followed-up N = 64 individuals diagnosed with MCI (M = 73 years, 44% female) for 3 years. MA were assessed by long-term informants of the participants using two scales: motivation and decision regulation [Volitional Components Questionnaires, VCQ, (Kuhl and Fuhrmann, Decomposing self-regulation and self-control: the volitional components inventory, 1998)]. Cognitive abilities were assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination (J Psychiatr Res 12:189-98, 1975). Survival analyses and multilevel modeling (MLM) were applied to determine the predicting effect of informant-rated MA at baseline on the likelihood of MCI stability and on the trajectory of cognitive abilities.

RESULTS: Fifty percent (n = 32) of the MCI participants remained stable, while 32.8% (n = 21) and 17.2% (n = 11) converted to Alzheimer's disease (AD) or dropped-out, respectively. Survival analyses revealed that MCI cases with higher-rated MA at baseline were more likely to exert a stable course in MCI over 3 years (p = 0.036) when controlling for demographic characteristics and executive function. MLM analyses indicated that higher informant-rated MA at baseline were significantly related to higher cognitive abilities, even when controlling for MCI subtype (p = 0.030).

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides preliminary longitudinal evidence for a lower risk of conversion to AD and higher cognitive abilities by higher rated MA at an early stage of MCI.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Geriatrics and Gerontology
Language:English
Date:13 August 2018
Deposited On:09 Oct 2018 12:33
Last Modified:13 May 2020 22:28
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-2318
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-018-0865-5
PubMed ID:30103681
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100019_124535
  • : Project TitleMotivational Reserve as protective psychological factor in mild Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI)
  • : FunderVelux Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderTropos Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderKurt Fries Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderSwiss Alzheimer’s Association
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title

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