Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Invisible Social Support and Invisible Social Control in Dual-smoker Couple's Everyday Life: A Dyadic Perspective


Lüscher, Janina; Hohl, Diana Hilda; Knoll, Nina; Scholz, Urte (2019). Invisible Social Support and Invisible Social Control in Dual-smoker Couple's Everyday Life: A Dyadic Perspective. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 53(6):527-540.

Abstract

Background: Invisible exchange processes (i.e., invisible support, invisible control) are commonly operationalized as support or control provided by a partner, but unnoticed by the recipient, and have been reported to be beneficially related to affect. However, studies have almost exclusively focused on affect as an outcome and rather neglected other outcomes, such as health behavior. One study so far demonstrated a coupling of invisible support and increased unhealthy behavior.

Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate differences in invisible exchanges within a dyadic context of heterosexual, romantic dual-smoker couples. We tested whether women's and men's invisible exchanges were associated with negative affect and smoking in everyday life of dual-smoker couples.

Methods: In a dyadic daily diary study, invisible emotional and instrumental support, invisible positive and negative control, negative affect, and daily smoking were independently assessed in both partners of 83 dual-smoker couples after a joint self-set quit date.

Results: Analyses based on the two-intercept model revealed that at the between-person level invisible support and control were both related to less negative affect, albeit in men only, and were unrelated to smoking behavior. At the within-person level, invisible exchanges were on the whole unrelated to negative affect and smoking.

Conclusions: Invisible support and invisible control may serve as protective buffers for negative affect in a health-behavior change context for male partners of dual-smoker couples. Future research should clarify under what conditions invisible exchanges unfold positive effects on partners' well-being and health behavior in different health contexts.

Abstract

Background: Invisible exchange processes (i.e., invisible support, invisible control) are commonly operationalized as support or control provided by a partner, but unnoticed by the recipient, and have been reported to be beneficially related to affect. However, studies have almost exclusively focused on affect as an outcome and rather neglected other outcomes, such as health behavior. One study so far demonstrated a coupling of invisible support and increased unhealthy behavior.

Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate differences in invisible exchanges within a dyadic context of heterosexual, romantic dual-smoker couples. We tested whether women's and men's invisible exchanges were associated with negative affect and smoking in everyday life of dual-smoker couples.

Methods: In a dyadic daily diary study, invisible emotional and instrumental support, invisible positive and negative control, negative affect, and daily smoking were independently assessed in both partners of 83 dual-smoker couples after a joint self-set quit date.

Results: Analyses based on the two-intercept model revealed that at the between-person level invisible support and control were both related to less negative affect, albeit in men only, and were unrelated to smoking behavior. At the within-person level, invisible exchanges were on the whole unrelated to negative affect and smoking.

Conclusions: Invisible support and invisible control may serve as protective buffers for negative affect in a health-behavior change context for male partners of dual-smoker couples. Future research should clarify under what conditions invisible exchanges unfold positive effects on partners' well-being and health behavior in different health contexts.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:3 May 2019
Deposited On:10 Oct 2018 10:57
Last Modified:17 Sep 2019 19:39
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0883-6612
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/abm/kay062
PubMed ID:30060071
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPP00P1_133632
  • : Project TitleInter- and intraindividual dynamics in health behavior change

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library