Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Are open and neurotic behaviors related to cognitive behaviors in daily life of older adults?


Aschwanden, Damaris; Luchetti, Martina; Allemand, Mathias (2019). Are open and neurotic behaviors related to cognitive behaviors in daily life of older adults? Journal of Personality, 87(3):472-484.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Previous research has shown a positive relationship between Openness and cognitive engagement as well as Neuroticism and cognitive complaints at the between-person level. However, less is known about these associations at the within-person level in daily life. Using daily assessments, the present study examined these associations both at the between-person and within-person level. Knowing the within-person associations is important to provide valuable information for simple preventive and interceptive intervention strategies.

METHOD: This study sampled 136 healthy older participants (M = 70.45 years; 41.2% male). Open and neurotic behaviors as well as cognitive engagement and complaints were measured every evening over 11 days.

RESULTS: The results of multilevel models showed a positive association between open behaviors and cognitive engagement at the between-person and within-person level. For neurotic behaviors and cognitive complaints, no association was found at either level of analysis.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings extend previous research by providing the investigation of the associations between specific naturally occurring behaviors related to personality and cognition in the daily life of older adults at the within-person level. Furthermore, these results may offer some basis for future intervention studies that should test whether a simple intervention aimed at promoting Openness-related behaviors may increase cognitive engagement.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Previous research has shown a positive relationship between Openness and cognitive engagement as well as Neuroticism and cognitive complaints at the between-person level. However, less is known about these associations at the within-person level in daily life. Using daily assessments, the present study examined these associations both at the between-person and within-person level. Knowing the within-person associations is important to provide valuable information for simple preventive and interceptive intervention strategies.

METHOD: This study sampled 136 healthy older participants (M = 70.45 years; 41.2% male). Open and neurotic behaviors as well as cognitive engagement and complaints were measured every evening over 11 days.

RESULTS: The results of multilevel models showed a positive association between open behaviors and cognitive engagement at the between-person and within-person level. For neurotic behaviors and cognitive complaints, no association was found at either level of analysis.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings extend previous research by providing the investigation of the associations between specific naturally occurring behaviors related to personality and cognition in the daily life of older adults at the within-person level. Furthermore, these results may offer some basis for future intervention studies that should test whether a simple intervention aimed at promoting Openness-related behaviors may increase cognitive engagement.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 11 Oct 2018
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych Erstautor
Language:English
Date:1 June 2019
Deposited On:11 Oct 2018 11:39
Last Modified:09 May 2019 01:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0022-3506
Additional Information:For accepted manuscripts: This is the peer reviewed version of the article: "Are open and neurotic behaviors related to cognitive behaviors in daily life of older adults?", which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12409. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. (http://www.wileyauthors.com/self-archiving)
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12409
PubMed ID:30047126
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100019_159349
  • : Project TitleRealizing healthy years through health maintenance (RHYTHM)
  • : Fundernternational Max Planck Research School on the Life Course
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title

Download