Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Making concessions: extractive enclaves, entangled capitalism and regulative pluralism at the gold mining frontier in Burkina Faso


Côte, Muriel; Korf, Benedikt (2018). Making concessions: extractive enclaves, entangled capitalism and regulative pluralism at the gold mining frontier in Burkina Faso. World Development, 101:466-476.

Abstract

This paper studies the regulation of concessions in the global gold mining rush. The liberalization of the gold mining sector has given way to complex forms of regulation where non-state and illegal mining entrepreneurs compete in governing mining extraction. Taking the case of gold mining in Burkina Faso, this paper analyses the conditions and dynamics under which such complex regulation takes place. We draw on extensive ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Northern Burkina Faso, in particular the Burkinabè mining sector. We argue that enclave economies in the gold mining sector are co-produced by state and market regulation through a ‘‘plurification” of regulatory authority. This ‘‘plurification” is the effect of competition among different frontier entrepreneurs, who seek to broker regulatory authority in mining concession sites. We show that concession sites are not discrete extractive enclaves, but are better understood as indiscrete sites that are entangled in local politics and social relations. Rather than thinning social relations, as is often claimed, we observe that enclave economies thicken politics around concessionary regimes, where governmental bodies re-emerge as an arbitrating regulatory force. These findings problematize policy prescriptions to formalize the gold mining sector and draw attention to the role of the state in re/producing frontier entrepreneurs with unequal political rights to claiming concessions.

Abstract

This paper studies the regulation of concessions in the global gold mining rush. The liberalization of the gold mining sector has given way to complex forms of regulation where non-state and illegal mining entrepreneurs compete in governing mining extraction. Taking the case of gold mining in Burkina Faso, this paper analyses the conditions and dynamics under which such complex regulation takes place. We draw on extensive ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Northern Burkina Faso, in particular the Burkinabè mining sector. We argue that enclave economies in the gold mining sector are co-produced by state and market regulation through a ‘‘plurification” of regulatory authority. This ‘‘plurification” is the effect of competition among different frontier entrepreneurs, who seek to broker regulatory authority in mining concession sites. We show that concession sites are not discrete extractive enclaves, but are better understood as indiscrete sites that are entangled in local politics and social relations. Rather than thinning social relations, as is often claimed, we observe that enclave economies thicken politics around concessionary regimes, where governmental bodies re-emerge as an arbitrating regulatory force. These findings problematize policy prescriptions to formalize the gold mining sector and draw attention to the role of the state in re/producing frontier entrepreneurs with unequal political rights to claiming concessions.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
15 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 26 Oct 2018
4 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Uncontrolled Keywords:Geography, Planning and Development, Economics and Econometrics, Development, Sociology and Political Science
Language:English
Date:1 January 2018
Deposited On:26 Oct 2018 09:43
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:50
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0305-750X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2016.11.002

Download