Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

„Quantified seniors“


Seifert, Alexander; Meidert, Ursula (2018). „Quantified seniors“. Prävention und Gesundheitsförderung, 13(4):353-360.

Abstract

Background Nowadays, activity data and vital signs are generally measured digitally with activity sensors, wearables, and apps on smartphones. However, there are hardly any studies that empirically investigate the everyday use of these self-measurement technologies by older individuals. Objectives This report examines the use of mobile digital self-measurement applications, with a focus on smartphone apps, for individuals aged 50+ years and asks for influencing factors, measured parameters, and motivations for use. Materials and methods Two samples from Switzerland were used for a secondary analysis to answer the research questions. A total of 2502 persons were surveyed, with the focus of the analysis on people aged 50 and over (n = 1227). The data were descriptively analyzed and group differences were validated using Cramer-V and binary logistic regressions. Results Nearly half of participants measure themselves with self-measurement technologies. About one-third of the individuals, who own a smartphone, use apps for health-related self-measurement. Self-measuring with smartphones and apps is the most popular method followed by fitness trackers and smartwatches. Use depends significantly on age and technology affinity. Mainly, physical activities but also information on vital functions such as pulse are measured. The motivation for these self-measurement activities is to stay healthy, to optimize one’s performance, and the incentive to try new things.

Abstract

Background Nowadays, activity data and vital signs are generally measured digitally with activity sensors, wearables, and apps on smartphones. However, there are hardly any studies that empirically investigate the everyday use of these self-measurement technologies by older individuals. Objectives This report examines the use of mobile digital self-measurement applications, with a focus on smartphone apps, for individuals aged 50+ years and asks for influencing factors, measured parameters, and motivations for use. Materials and methods Two samples from Switzerland were used for a secondary analysis to answer the research questions. A total of 2502 persons were surveyed, with the focus of the analysis on people aged 50 and over (n = 1227). The data were descriptively analyzed and group differences were validated using Cramer-V and binary logistic regressions. Results Nearly half of participants measure themselves with self-measurement technologies. About one-third of the individuals, who own a smartphone, use apps for health-related self-measurement. Self-measuring with smartphones and apps is the most popular method followed by fitness trackers and smartwatches. Use depends significantly on age and technology affinity. Mainly, physical activities but also information on vital functions such as pulse are measured. The motivation for these self-measurement activities is to stay healthy, to optimize one’s performance, and the incentive to try new things.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Center for Gerontology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:German
Date:1 November 2018
Deposited On:02 Nov 2018 14:32
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:51
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1861-6755
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11553-018-0646-1

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library