Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Impact of Changes in Systemic Physiology on fNIRS/NIRS Signals: Analysis Based on Oblique Subspace Projections Decomposition


Nasseri, Nassim; Caicedo, Alexander; Scholkmann, Felix; Zohdi, Hamoon; Wolf, Ursula (2018). Impact of Changes in Systemic Physiology on fNIRS/NIRS Signals: Analysis Based on Oblique Subspace Projections Decomposition. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 1072:119-125.

Abstract

Measurements of cerebral and muscle oxygenation (StO) and perfusion ([tHb]) with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), respectively, can be influenced by changes in systemic physiology. The aim of our study was to apply the oblique subspace projections signal decomposition (OSPSD) to find the contribution from systemic physiology, i.e. heart rate (HR), electrocardiography (ECG)-derived respiration (EDR) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO) to StO and [tHb] signals measured on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and calf muscle. OSPSD was applied to two datasets (n = 42, n = 79 measurements) from two fNIRS/NIRS speech studies. We found that (i) all StO and [tHb] signals contained components related to changes in systemic physiology, (ii) the contribution from systemic physiology varied strongly between subjects, and (iii) changes in systemic physiology generally influenced fNIRS signals on the left and right PFC to a similar degree.

Abstract

Measurements of cerebral and muscle oxygenation (StO) and perfusion ([tHb]) with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), respectively, can be influenced by changes in systemic physiology. The aim of our study was to apply the oblique subspace projections signal decomposition (OSPSD) to find the contribution from systemic physiology, i.e. heart rate (HR), electrocardiography (ECG)-derived respiration (EDR) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO) to StO and [tHb] signals measured on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and calf muscle. OSPSD was applied to two datasets (n = 42, n = 79 measurements) from two fNIRS/NIRS speech studies. We found that (i) all StO and [tHb] signals contained components related to changes in systemic physiology, (ii) the contribution from systemic physiology varied strongly between subjects, and (iii) changes in systemic physiology generally influenced fNIRS signals on the left and right PFC to a similar degree.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
6 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Language:English
Date:30 August 2018
Deposited On:15 Nov 2018 08:33
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 08:01
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0065-2598
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-91287-5_19
PubMed ID:30178333

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library