Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Disturbance of approach-avoidance behaviors in non-human primates by stimulation of the limbic territories of basal ganglia and anterior insula


Saga, Yosuke; Ruff, Christian C; Tremblay, Léon (2019). Disturbance of approach-avoidance behaviors in non-human primates by stimulation of the limbic territories of basal ganglia and anterior insula. European Journal of Neuroscience, 49(5):687-700.

Abstract

The basal ganglia (BG) are involved in motivation and goal‐directed behavior. Recent studies suggest that limbic territories of BG not only support reward seeking (appetitive approach) but also the encoding of aversive conditioned stimuli (CS) and the production of aversive‐related behaviors (avoidance or escape). This study aimed to identify inside two BG nuclei, the striatum and pallidum, the territories involved in aversive behaviors and to compare the effects of stimulating these territories to those resulting from stimulation of the anterior Insula (aIns), a region that is well‐known to be involved in aversive encoding and associated behaviors. Two monkeys performed an approach/avoidance task in which they had to choose a behavior (approach or avoidance) in an appetitive (reward) or aversive (air‐puff) context. During this task, either one (single‐cue) or two (dual‐cue) CS provided essential information about which context‐adapted behavior should be selected. Microstimulation was applied during the CS presentation. Stimulation generally reduced approaches in the appetitive contexts and increased escape behaviors (premature responses) and/or passive avoidance (noninitiated action) in aversive context. These effects were more pronounced in ventral parts of all examined structures, with significant differences observed between stimulated structures. Thresholds to induce effects were lowest in the pallidum. Striatal stimulation led to the largest diversity of effects, with a subregion even leading to enhanced active avoidance. Finally, aIns stimulations produced stronger effects in the dual‐cue context. These results provide causal evidence that limbic territories of BG, like aIns, play crucial roles in the selection of context‐motivated behaviors.

Abstract

The basal ganglia (BG) are involved in motivation and goal‐directed behavior. Recent studies suggest that limbic territories of BG not only support reward seeking (appetitive approach) but also the encoding of aversive conditioned stimuli (CS) and the production of aversive‐related behaviors (avoidance or escape). This study aimed to identify inside two BG nuclei, the striatum and pallidum, the territories involved in aversive behaviors and to compare the effects of stimulating these territories to those resulting from stimulation of the anterior Insula (aIns), a region that is well‐known to be involved in aversive encoding and associated behaviors. Two monkeys performed an approach/avoidance task in which they had to choose a behavior (approach or avoidance) in an appetitive (reward) or aversive (air‐puff) context. During this task, either one (single‐cue) or two (dual‐cue) CS provided essential information about which context‐adapted behavior should be selected. Microstimulation was applied during the CS presentation. Stimulation generally reduced approaches in the appetitive contexts and increased escape behaviors (premature responses) and/or passive avoidance (noninitiated action) in aversive context. These effects were more pronounced in ventral parts of all examined structures, with significant differences observed between stimulated structures. Thresholds to induce effects were lowest in the pallidum. Striatal stimulation led to the largest diversity of effects, with a subregion even leading to enhanced active avoidance. Finally, aIns stimulations produced stronger effects in the dual‐cue context. These results provide causal evidence that limbic territories of BG, like aIns, play crucial roles in the selection of context‐motivated behaviors.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

3 downloads since deposited on 07 Nov 2018
3 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Uncontrolled Keywords:General neuroscience, anxiety-related behavior, monkey, pallidum, value-based decision, ventral striatum
Language:German
Date:1 March 2019
Deposited On:07 Nov 2018 12:22
Last Modified:22 Mar 2019 02:02
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0953-816X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ejn.14201
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPP00P1_150739
  • : Project TitleThe neural basis of economic and moral utility

Download