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Carrying a selfish genetic element predicts increased migration propensity in free-living wild house mice


Runge, Jan-Niklas; Lindholm, Anna K (2018). Carrying a selfish genetic element predicts increased migration propensity in free-living wild house mice. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B: Biological Sciences, 285(1888):20181333.

Abstract

Life is built on cooperation between genes, which makes it vulnerable to parasitism. Selfish genetic elements that exploit this cooperation can achieve large fitness gains by increasing their transmission relative to the rest of the genome. This leads to counter-adaptations that generate unique selection pressures on the selfish genetic element. This arms race is similar to host–parasite coevolution, as some multi-host parasites alter the host’s behaviour to increase the chance of transmission to the next host. Here, we ask if, similarly to these parasites, a selfish genetic element in house mice, the t haplotype, also manipulates host behaviour, specifically the host’s migration propensity. Variants of the t that manipulate migration propensity could increase in fitness in a meta-population. We show that juvenile mice carrying the t haplotype were more likely to emigrate from and were more often found as migrants within a long-term free-living house mouse population. This result may have applied relevance as the t has been proposed as a basis for artificial gene drive systems for use in population control.

Abstract

Life is built on cooperation between genes, which makes it vulnerable to parasitism. Selfish genetic elements that exploit this cooperation can achieve large fitness gains by increasing their transmission relative to the rest of the genome. This leads to counter-adaptations that generate unique selection pressures on the selfish genetic element. This arms race is similar to host–parasite coevolution, as some multi-host parasites alter the host’s behaviour to increase the chance of transmission to the next host. Here, we ask if, similarly to these parasites, a selfish genetic element in house mice, the t haplotype, also manipulates host behaviour, specifically the host’s migration propensity. Variants of the t that manipulate migration propensity could increase in fitness in a meta-population. We show that juvenile mice carrying the t haplotype were more likely to emigrate from and were more often found as migrants within a long-term free-living house mouse population. This result may have applied relevance as the t has been proposed as a basis for artificial gene drive systems for use in population control.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Immunology and Microbiology, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, General Environmental Science, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:10 October 2018
Deposited On:22 Nov 2018 13:21
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:51
Publisher:Royal Society Publishing
ISSN:0962-8452
OA Status:Green
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2018.1333
PubMed ID:30282651
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID31003A_160328
  • : Project TitleEvolutionary ecology of a selfish genetic element - the t haplotype in wild house mice
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID31003A-120444
  • : Project TitleMaternal selection in a population of wild house mice
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID310030M_138389
  • : Project TitleEvolution of a selfish genetic element in wild house mice (D-A-CH/MFCL)
  • : FunderPromotor Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project TitleDo wild mice behave like cuckoos?
  • : FunderClaraz-Stiftung
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project TitleFitness and Migration Propensity of the t Haplotype in Experimentally Varied Densities
  • : FunderJulius Klaus Stiftung
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project TitleHeritability of cooperation

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