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Virus-Induced Interferon-γ Causes Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle and Derails Glycemic Control in Obesity


Šestan, Marko; Marinović, Sonja; Kavazović, Inga; Cekinović, Đurđica; Wueest, Stephan; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Brizić, Ilija; Jonjić, Stipan; Konrad, Daniel; Wensveen, Felix M; Polić, Bojan (2018). Virus-Induced Interferon-γ Causes Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle and Derails Glycemic Control in Obesity. Immunity, 49(1):164-177.e6.

Abstract

Pro-inflammatory cytokines of a T helper-1-signature are known to promote insulin resistance (IR) in obesity, but the physiological role of this mechanism is unclear. It is also unknown whether and how viral infection induces loss of glycemic control in subjects at risk for developing diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). We have found in mice and humans that viral infection caused short-term systemic IR. Virally-induced interferon-γ (IFN-γ) directly targeted skeletal muscle to downregulate the insulin receptor but did not cause loss of glycemic control because of a compensatory increase of insulin production. Hyperinsulinemia enhanced antiviral immunity through direct stimulation of CD8 effector T cell function. In pre-diabetic mice with hepatic IR caused by diet-induced obesity, infection resulted in loss of glycemic control. Thus, upon pathogen encounter, the immune system transiently reduces insulin sensitivity of skeletal muscle to induce hyperinsulinemia and promote antiviral immunity, which derails to glucose intolerance in pre-diabetic obese subjects. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

Abstract

Pro-inflammatory cytokines of a T helper-1-signature are known to promote insulin resistance (IR) in obesity, but the physiological role of this mechanism is unclear. It is also unknown whether and how viral infection induces loss of glycemic control in subjects at risk for developing diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). We have found in mice and humans that viral infection caused short-term systemic IR. Virally-induced interferon-γ (IFN-γ) directly targeted skeletal muscle to downregulate the insulin receptor but did not cause loss of glycemic control because of a compensatory increase of insulin production. Hyperinsulinemia enhanced antiviral immunity through direct stimulation of CD8 effector T cell function. In pre-diabetic mice with hepatic IR caused by diet-induced obesity, infection resulted in loss of glycemic control. Thus, upon pathogen encounter, the immune system transiently reduces insulin sensitivity of skeletal muscle to induce hyperinsulinemia and promote antiviral immunity, which derails to glucose intolerance in pre-diabetic obese subjects. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:17 July 2018
Deposited On:29 Jan 2019 13:17
Last Modified:03 Feb 2019 06:47
Publisher:Cell Press (Elsevier)
ISSN:1074-7613
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2018.05.005
PubMed ID:29958802

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