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Temporality and mediality in late medieval and early modern culture


Temporality and mediality in late medieval and early modern culture. Edited by: Stercken, Martina; Kiening, Christian (2018). Turnhout: Brepols.

Abstract

This book provides a new approach to media and mediality from the perspective of cultural history, focusing on a variety of medieval and early modern cultural forms. This interdisciplinary volume explores the ways in which time is staged at the threshold between the Middle Ages and the early modern period. Proceeding from the reality that all cultural forms are inherently and inescapably temporal, it seeks to discover the significance of time in mediations and communications of all kinds. By showing how time is displayed in diverse cultural strategies and situations, the essays of this volume show how time is intrinsic to the very concept of tradition. In exploring a variety of medial forms and communicative practices, they also reveal that while the beginning of the age of printing (around 1500) may mark a fundamental change in terms of reproduction and circulation, artefacts and other historical traditions continue to employ earlier systems and practices relating time and space. The volume features articles by leading researchers in their respective fields, including studies on mosaics as a medium reflecting space and time; the triptych’s potential as a time machine; winged altarpieces mediating eternity; texts and images of the passion of Christ permeating past, present, and future; dimensions of time embedded in maps; a compendium of world knowledge organized by forms of time and temporality; the figuration of prophecy in times of crisis; the portrayal of time in architecture. The volume thus provides a new approach to media and mediality from the perspective of cultural history.

Abstract

This book provides a new approach to media and mediality from the perspective of cultural history, focusing on a variety of medieval and early modern cultural forms. This interdisciplinary volume explores the ways in which time is staged at the threshold between the Middle Ages and the early modern period. Proceeding from the reality that all cultural forms are inherently and inescapably temporal, it seeks to discover the significance of time in mediations and communications of all kinds. By showing how time is displayed in diverse cultural strategies and situations, the essays of this volume show how time is intrinsic to the very concept of tradition. In exploring a variety of medial forms and communicative practices, they also reveal that while the beginning of the age of printing (around 1500) may mark a fundamental change in terms of reproduction and circulation, artefacts and other historical traditions continue to employ earlier systems and practices relating time and space. The volume features articles by leading researchers in their respective fields, including studies on mosaics as a medium reflecting space and time; the triptych’s potential as a time machine; winged altarpieces mediating eternity; texts and images of the passion of Christ permeating past, present, and future; dimensions of time embedded in maps; a compendium of world knowledge organized by forms of time and temporality; the figuration of prophecy in times of crisis; the portrayal of time in architecture. The volume thus provides a new approach to media and mediality from the perspective of cultural history.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Edited Scientific Work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of History
Dewey Decimal Classification:900 History
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:13 Nov 2018 13:49
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:52
Publisher:Brepols
Series Name:Cursor mundi
Volume:32
Number of Pages:254
ISBN:978-2-503-55130-2
OA Status:Closed
Related URLs:https://www.recherche-portal.ch/primo-explore/fulldisplay?docid=ebi01_prod011202384&context=L&vid=ZAD&search_scope=default_scope&tab=default_tab&lang=de_DE (Library Catalogue)

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