Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Fragments and Dust after Holmium Laser Lithotripsy with or without "Moses Technology": How are they different?


Keller, Etienne Xavier; De Coninck, Vincent; Audouin, Marie; Doizi, Steeve; Bazin, Dominique; Daudon, Michel; Traxer, Olivier (2019). Fragments and Dust after Holmium Laser Lithotripsy with or without "Moses Technology": How are they different? Journal of Biophotonics, 12(4):e201800227.

Abstract

Urinary stones can be readily disintegrated by Holmium:YAG laser (Holmium laser lithotripsy), resulting in a mixture of small stone dust particles which will spontaneously evacuate with urine and larger residual fragments requiring mechanical retrieval. Differences between fragments and dust have not been well characterized. Also, it remains unknown how the recently introduced "Moses technology" may alter stone disintegration products. Three complementary analytical techniques have been used in this study to offer an in-depth characterization of disintegration products after in vitro Holmium laser lithotripsy: stereoscopic microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Dust was separated from fragments based on its floating ability in saline irrigation. Depending on initial crystalline constituents, stone dust either conserved attributes found in larger residual fragments or showed changes in crystalline organization. These included conversion of calcium oxalate dihydrate towards calcium oxalate monohydrate, changes in carbapatite spectra towards an amorphous phase, changes of magnesium ammonium phosphate towards a differing amorphous and crystalline phase and the appearance of hydroxyapatite on brushite fragments. Comparatively, "Moses technology" produced more pronounced changes. These findings provide new insights suggesting a photothermal effect occurring in Holmium laser lithotripsy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Abstract

Urinary stones can be readily disintegrated by Holmium:YAG laser (Holmium laser lithotripsy), resulting in a mixture of small stone dust particles which will spontaneously evacuate with urine and larger residual fragments requiring mechanical retrieval. Differences between fragments and dust have not been well characterized. Also, it remains unknown how the recently introduced "Moses technology" may alter stone disintegration products. Three complementary analytical techniques have been used in this study to offer an in-depth characterization of disintegration products after in vitro Holmium laser lithotripsy: stereoscopic microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Dust was separated from fragments based on its floating ability in saline irrigation. Depending on initial crystalline constituents, stone dust either conserved attributes found in larger residual fragments or showed changes in crystalline organization. These included conversion of calcium oxalate dihydrate towards calcium oxalate monohydrate, changes in carbapatite spectra towards an amorphous phase, changes of magnesium ammonium phosphate towards a differing amorphous and crystalline phase and the appearance of hydroxyapatite on brushite fragments. Comparatively, "Moses technology" produced more pronounced changes. These findings provide new insights suggesting a photothermal effect occurring in Holmium laser lithotripsy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
13 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Urological Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > General Chemistry
Physical Sciences > General Materials Science
Life Sciences > General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Physical Sciences > General Engineering
Physical Sciences > General Physics and Astronomy
Language:English
Date:1 April 2019
Deposited On:23 Nov 2018 09:14
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 08:04
Publisher:Wiley-VCH Verlag
ISSN:1864-063X
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/jbio.201800227
PubMed ID:30315636

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library