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Increased Default Mode Network Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder During Reward Processing


Koch, Kathrin; Reeß, Tim J; Rus, Oana G; Gürsel, Deniz A; Wagner, Gerd; Berberich, Götz; Zimmer, Claus (2018). Increased Default Mode Network Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder During Reward Processing. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 9:254.

Abstract

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by anxiety-provoking, obsessive thoughts (i.e., obsessions) which patients react to with compulsive behaviors (i.e., compulsions). Due to the transient feeling of relief following the reduction of obsession-induced anxiety, compulsions are often described as relieving or even rewarding. Several studies investigated functional activation during reward processing in OCD, but findings are heterogeneous up to now and little is known about potential alterations in functional connectivity. Against this background we studied OCD patients ( = 44) and healthy controls ( = 37) during the receipt of monetary reward by assessing both activation and functional connectivity. Patients showed a decreased activation in several frontal regions and the posterior cingulate (PCC, BA31) together with a stronger connectivity between the PCC and the vmPFC (BA10). Present findings demonstrate an increased connectivity in patients within major nodes of the default mode network (DMN)-a network known to be involved in the evaluation of internal mental states. These results may indicate an increased activity of internal, self-related processing at the expense of a normal responsiveness toward external rewards and incentives. This, in turn, may explain the constant urge for additional reinforcement and patients' inability to inhibit their compulsive behaviors.

Abstract

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by anxiety-provoking, obsessive thoughts (i.e., obsessions) which patients react to with compulsive behaviors (i.e., compulsions). Due to the transient feeling of relief following the reduction of obsession-induced anxiety, compulsions are often described as relieving or even rewarding. Several studies investigated functional activation during reward processing in OCD, but findings are heterogeneous up to now and little is known about potential alterations in functional connectivity. Against this background we studied OCD patients ( = 44) and healthy controls ( = 37) during the receipt of monetary reward by assessing both activation and functional connectivity. Patients showed a decreased activation in several frontal regions and the posterior cingulate (PCC, BA31) together with a stronger connectivity between the PCC and the vmPFC (BA10). Present findings demonstrate an increased connectivity in patients within major nodes of the default mode network (DMN)-a network known to be involved in the evaluation of internal mental states. These results may indicate an increased activity of internal, self-related processing at the expense of a normal responsiveness toward external rewards and incentives. This, in turn, may explain the constant urge for additional reinforcement and patients' inability to inhibit their compulsive behaviors.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neuroradiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:23 Nov 2018 13:24
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:52
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1664-0640
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00254
PubMed ID:29951007

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