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Haemoplasmosis in cats: European guidelines from the ABCD on prevention and management


Tasker, Séverine; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Belák, Sándor; Frymus, Tadeusz; Addie, Diane D; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Egberink, Herman; Hartmann, Katrin; Hosie, Margaret J; Lloret, Albert; Marsilio, Fulvio; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Möstl, Karin (2018). Haemoplasmosis in cats: European guidelines from the ABCD on prevention and management. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 20(3):256-261.

Abstract

OVERVIEW: Haemoplasmas are haemotropic bacteria that can induce anaemia in a wide range of mammalian species. Infection in cats: Mycoplasma haemofelis is the most pathogenic of the three main feline haemoplasma species known to infect cats. ' Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' and ' Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' are less pathogenic but can result in disease in immunocompromised cats. Male, non-pedigree cats with outdoor access are more likely to be haemoplasma infected, and ' Candidatus M haemominutum' is more common in older cats. All three haemoplasma species can be carried asymptomatically. Transmission: The natural mode of transmission of haemoplasma infection is not known, but aggressive interactions and vectors are possibilities. Transmission by blood transfusion can occur and all blood donors should be screened for haemoplasma infection.
DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT: PCR assays are the preferred diagnostic method for haemoplasma infections. Treatment with doxycycline for 2-4 weeks is usually effective for M haemofelis-associated clinical disease (but this may not clear infection). Little information is currently available on the antibiotic responsiveness of ' Candidatus M haemominutum' and ' Candidatus M turicensis'.

Abstract

OVERVIEW: Haemoplasmas are haemotropic bacteria that can induce anaemia in a wide range of mammalian species. Infection in cats: Mycoplasma haemofelis is the most pathogenic of the three main feline haemoplasma species known to infect cats. ' Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' and ' Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' are less pathogenic but can result in disease in immunocompromised cats. Male, non-pedigree cats with outdoor access are more likely to be haemoplasma infected, and ' Candidatus M haemominutum' is more common in older cats. All three haemoplasma species can be carried asymptomatically. Transmission: The natural mode of transmission of haemoplasma infection is not known, but aggressive interactions and vectors are possibilities. Transmission by blood transfusion can occur and all blood donors should be screened for haemoplasma infection.
DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT: PCR assays are the preferred diagnostic method for haemoplasma infections. Treatment with doxycycline for 2-4 weeks is usually effective for M haemofelis-associated clinical disease (but this may not clear infection). Little information is currently available on the antibiotic responsiveness of ' Candidatus M haemominutum' and ' Candidatus M turicensis'.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Clinical Diagnostics and Services
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:March 2018
Deposited On:16 Nov 2018 15:57
Last Modified:28 Feb 2019 08:14
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:1098-612X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1098612X18758594
PubMed ID:29478400

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