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Clinical trajectories in the ultra-high risk for psychosis population


Abstract

BACKGROUND Traditionally, research in the ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis population has focused on the treatment of existing symptomatology and prevention of transition to psychosis. Recently, there has been an increase in focus on outcomes in individuals who do not transition to psychosis. However, there is a lack of standardised definitions of remission, recovery, recurrence and relapse in UHR, resulting in the inability to generalise and replicate outcomes. METHOD The aims of the current study were to develop definitions for remission, recovery, recurrence and relapse, and apply them to a UHR cohort allowing the identification of longitudinal clinical trajectories. Further stratification in broader categories of favourable and unfavourable outcomes was applied. The predictive value of various baseline factors on specific clinical trajectories was also assessed. RESULTS 17 different trajectories were identified in a cohort of 202 individuals within a 12-month period and classified according to the suggested definitions for recovery (35.7%), remission (7.5%), any recurrence (20%), no remission (17.3%), relapse (4.0%) and transition to psychosis (15.8%). Favourable and unfavourable trajectories represented 43.2% and 57.1% respectively. Long duration of untreated symptoms and high depression scores were associated with unfavourable outcomes. DISCUSSION It is possible to apply clear definitions of remission, recovery, recurrence, relapse and transition to psychosis to a UHR cohort to evaluate longitudinal clinical trajectories. Acceptance and use of these definitions will help to facilitate comparisons between trials and to improve clinical clarity across the range of available therapeutic options in UHR individuals.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Traditionally, research in the ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis population has focused on the treatment of existing symptomatology and prevention of transition to psychosis. Recently, there has been an increase in focus on outcomes in individuals who do not transition to psychosis. However, there is a lack of standardised definitions of remission, recovery, recurrence and relapse in UHR, resulting in the inability to generalise and replicate outcomes. METHOD The aims of the current study were to develop definitions for remission, recovery, recurrence and relapse, and apply them to a UHR cohort allowing the identification of longitudinal clinical trajectories. Further stratification in broader categories of favourable and unfavourable outcomes was applied. The predictive value of various baseline factors on specific clinical trajectories was also assessed. RESULTS 17 different trajectories were identified in a cohort of 202 individuals within a 12-month period and classified according to the suggested definitions for recovery (35.7%), remission (7.5%), any recurrence (20%), no remission (17.3%), relapse (4.0%) and transition to psychosis (15.8%). Favourable and unfavourable trajectories represented 43.2% and 57.1% respectively. Long duration of untreated symptoms and high depression scores were associated with unfavourable outcomes. DISCUSSION It is possible to apply clear definitions of remission, recovery, recurrence, relapse and transition to psychosis to a UHR cohort to evaluate longitudinal clinical trajectories. Acceptance and use of these definitions will help to facilitate comparisons between trials and to improve clinical clarity across the range of available therapeutic options in UHR individuals.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:18 February 2018
Deposited On:27 Nov 2018 13:25
Last Modified:28 Nov 2018 08:34
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0920-9964
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2018.01.022
PubMed ID:29463457

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