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Weather and risk of ST-elevation myocardial infarction revisited: Impact on young women


Gebhard, Catherine; Gebhard, Caroline E; Stähli, Barbara E; Maafi, Foued; Bertrand, Marie-Jeanne; Wildi, Karin; Fortier, Annik; Galvan Onandia, Zurine; Toma, Aurel; Zhang, Zheng W; Smith, David C; Spagnoli, Vincent; Ly, Hung Q (2018). Weather and risk of ST-elevation myocardial infarction revisited: Impact on young women. PLoS ONE, 13(4):e0195602.

Abstract

BACKGROUND During the last decade, the incidence and mortality rates of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been steadily increasing in young women but not in men. Environmental variables that contribute to cardiovascular events in women remain ill-defined.
METHODS AND RESULTS A total of 2199 consecutive patients presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI, 25.8% women, mean age 62.6±12.4 years) were admitted at the Montreal Heart Institute between June 2010 and December 2014. Snow fall exceeding 2cm/day was identified as a positive predictor for STEMI admission rates in the overall population (RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.07-1.48, p = 0.005), with a significant effect being seen in men (RR 1.30, 95% CI 1.06-1.53, p = 0.01) but not in women (p = NS). An age-specific analysis revealed a significant increase in hospital admission rates for STEMI in younger women ≤55 years, (n = 104) during days with higher outside temperature (p = 0.004 vs men ≤55 years) and longer daylight hours (p = 0.0009 vs men ≤55 years). Accordingly, summer season, increased outside temperature and sunshine hours were identified as strong positive predictors for STEMI occurrence in women ≤55 years (RR 1.66, 95% CI 1.1-2.5, p = 0.012, RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.2-2.5, p = 0.007, and RR 1.67, 95% CI 1.2-2.5, p = 0.011, respectively), while an opposite trend was observed in men ≤55 years (RR for outside temperature 0.8, 95% CI 0.73-0.95, p = 0.01).
CONCLUSION The impact of environmental variables on STEMI is age- and sex-dependent. Higher temperature may play an important role in triggering such acute events in young women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND During the last decade, the incidence and mortality rates of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been steadily increasing in young women but not in men. Environmental variables that contribute to cardiovascular events in women remain ill-defined.
METHODS AND RESULTS A total of 2199 consecutive patients presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI, 25.8% women, mean age 62.6±12.4 years) were admitted at the Montreal Heart Institute between June 2010 and December 2014. Snow fall exceeding 2cm/day was identified as a positive predictor for STEMI admission rates in the overall population (RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.07-1.48, p = 0.005), with a significant effect being seen in men (RR 1.30, 95% CI 1.06-1.53, p = 0.01) but not in women (p = NS). An age-specific analysis revealed a significant increase in hospital admission rates for STEMI in younger women ≤55 years, (n = 104) during days with higher outside temperature (p = 0.004 vs men ≤55 years) and longer daylight hours (p = 0.0009 vs men ≤55 years). Accordingly, summer season, increased outside temperature and sunshine hours were identified as strong positive predictors for STEMI occurrence in women ≤55 years (RR 1.66, 95% CI 1.1-2.5, p = 0.012, RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.2-2.5, p = 0.007, and RR 1.67, 95% CI 1.2-2.5, p = 0.011, respectively), while an opposite trend was observed in men ≤55 years (RR for outside temperature 0.8, 95% CI 0.73-0.95, p = 0.01).
CONCLUSION The impact of environmental variables on STEMI is age- and sex-dependent. Higher temperature may play an important role in triggering such acute events in young women.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:04 Dec 2018 14:39
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:54
Publisher:Public Library of Science (PLoS)
ISSN:1932-6203
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0195602
PubMed ID:29630673

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