Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

When goals loom darker: Goal ambivalence moderates the effect of goal proximity on goal-related motivation


Brandstätter, Veronika; Koletzko, Svenja; Bettschart, Martin (2019). When goals loom darker: Goal ambivalence moderates the effect of goal proximity on goal-related motivation. European Journal of Social Psychology, 49(4):778-793.

Abstract

This research extends previous work on the self‐regulation of goal striving as well as effects of temporal and psychological distance on motivation. Borrowing from classic work on goal gradients and approach‐avoidance conflicts, we predicted that the experience of ambivalence toward a personal goal moderates the extent to which feeling or being close to goal attainment affects motivation, such that greater proximity to the goal has a negative effect on motivation at higher levels of experienced goal ambivalence. We find evidence for the hypothesized effect across three studies examining different goals (pursuing a degree, running a half‐marathon) with varying operationalizations of goal proximity (self‐reported, manipulated, temporal) and motivation (goal commitment, intention strength). These results validate that classic concepts of motivation science such as goal gradients and approach‐avoidance conflict are both relevant and applicable to the everyday pursuit of self‐set personal goals.

Abstract

This research extends previous work on the self‐regulation of goal striving as well as effects of temporal and psychological distance on motivation. Borrowing from classic work on goal gradients and approach‐avoidance conflicts, we predicted that the experience of ambivalence toward a personal goal moderates the extent to which feeling or being close to goal attainment affects motivation, such that greater proximity to the goal has a negative effect on motivation at higher levels of experienced goal ambivalence. We find evidence for the hypothesized effect across three studies examining different goals (pursuing a degree, running a half‐marathon) with varying operationalizations of goal proximity (self‐reported, manipulated, temporal) and motivation (goal commitment, intention strength). These results validate that classic concepts of motivation science such as goal gradients and approach‐avoidance conflict are both relevant and applicable to the everyday pursuit of self‐set personal goals.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Social Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 June 2019
Deposited On:26 Nov 2018 10:05
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:54
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0046-2772
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2541

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library