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Reanimationstraining für Laien in Erste-Hilfe-Kursen : Vermittlung von Wissen, Fertigkeiten und Haltungen


Breckwoldt, J; Lingemann, C; Wagner, P (2016). Reanimationstraining für Laien in Erste-Hilfe-Kursen : Vermittlung von Wissen, Fertigkeiten und Haltungen. Der Anästhesist, 65(1):22-29.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the most effective intervention for out of hospital sudden cardiac arrest; therefore, basic life support (BLS) courses for lay persons have become well established in industrialized countries, often since decades. Despite this favorable situation bystander CPR rates still remain low in some countries (e.g. in Germany), indicating serious implementation problems. The quality of instruction in these courses could be one reason for low bystander CPR rates. We therefore analyzed official lay BLS courses in terms of the teaching quality in the domains of knowledge, skills and attitudes (according to Bloom's taxonomy). MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 20 officially accredited lay BLS courses in Berlin, Germany, were analyzed by a participating observer, who remained blinded to the instructor and course participants until the end of the course. Courses were offered by German rescue organizations and private providers according to European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines. Teaching quality was rated by a standardized checklist including 21 observable criteria of teaching quality for transfer of knowledge (n = 10), skills (n = 8) and attitudes (n = 3). In order to achieve comparability between items the results of each criterion were quantified by Likert scales ranging from +2 (very good) to -2 (very poor). RESULTS The average score of all courses was +0.47 (SD ±0.46) for transfer of knowledge, +0.03 (SD ±0.61) for skills and -1.08 (SD ±0.73) for attitudes. In the domain of knowledge transfer, learning atmosphere and course structure were rated to be generally good, whilst marked deficits were found with respect to correctness of content. In the domain of skills the more positive ratings were given for teaching of single BLS elements (e.g. compressions and ventilation), in contrast to the training of BLS context, where e.g. realistic scenarios were only used by 3 out of 20 instructors. The domain of attitude transfer had the worst rating. Detailed ratings were -0.90 for "reducing fear of doing harm to the victim", -1.25 for "positive attribution of practical training" and -1.10 for "explaining course relevance from the learners' perspective". CONCLUSION Within the observed BLS courses the teaching quality revealed significant deficits, especially for the transfer of positive attitudes to learners. Also, the use of meaningful realistic scenario teaching was very scarce. These findings can significantly contribute to low bystander CPR rates because transfer of learned content into practice may be hampered.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the most effective intervention for out of hospital sudden cardiac arrest; therefore, basic life support (BLS) courses for lay persons have become well established in industrialized countries, often since decades. Despite this favorable situation bystander CPR rates still remain low in some countries (e.g. in Germany), indicating serious implementation problems. The quality of instruction in these courses could be one reason for low bystander CPR rates. We therefore analyzed official lay BLS courses in terms of the teaching quality in the domains of knowledge, skills and attitudes (according to Bloom's taxonomy). MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 20 officially accredited lay BLS courses in Berlin, Germany, were analyzed by a participating observer, who remained blinded to the instructor and course participants until the end of the course. Courses were offered by German rescue organizations and private providers according to European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines. Teaching quality was rated by a standardized checklist including 21 observable criteria of teaching quality for transfer of knowledge (n = 10), skills (n = 8) and attitudes (n = 3). In order to achieve comparability between items the results of each criterion were quantified by Likert scales ranging from +2 (very good) to -2 (very poor). RESULTS The average score of all courses was +0.47 (SD ±0.46) for transfer of knowledge, +0.03 (SD ±0.61) for skills and -1.08 (SD ±0.73) for attitudes. In the domain of knowledge transfer, learning atmosphere and course structure were rated to be generally good, whilst marked deficits were found with respect to correctness of content. In the domain of skills the more positive ratings were given for teaching of single BLS elements (e.g. compressions and ventilation), in contrast to the training of BLS context, where e.g. realistic scenarios were only used by 3 out of 20 instructors. The domain of attitude transfer had the worst rating. Detailed ratings were -0.90 for "reducing fear of doing harm to the victim", -1.25 for "positive attribution of practical training" and -1.10 for "explaining course relevance from the learners' perspective". CONCLUSION Within the observed BLS courses the teaching quality revealed significant deficits, especially for the transfer of positive attitudes to learners. Also, the use of meaningful realistic scenario teaching was very scarce. These findings can significantly contribute to low bystander CPR rates because transfer of learned content into practice may be hampered.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Resuscitation training for lay persons in first aid courses: Transfer of knowledge, skills and attitude
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords:lay bystander resuscitation; training; first aid course; teaching quality
Language:German
Date:January 2016
Deposited On:07 Dec 2018 11:11
Last Modified:31 Jul 2020 02:54
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0003-2417
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00101-015-0113-8
PubMed ID:26660899

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