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Magnetic resonance imaging of gas-solid fluidization with liquid bridging


Boyce, C M; Penn, A; Pruessmann, K P; Müller, C R (2018). Magnetic resonance imaging of gas-solid fluidization with liquid bridging. AIChE Journal, 64(8):2958-2971.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging is used to generate snapshots of particle concentration and velocity fields in gas–solid fluidized beds into which small amounts of liquid are injected. Three regimes of bed behavior (stationary, channeling, and bubbling) are mapped based on superficial velocity and liquid loading. Images are analyzed to determine quantitatively the number of bubbles, the bubble diameter, bed height, and the distribution of particle speeds under different wetting conditions. The cohesion and dissipation provided by liquid bridges cause an increase in the minimum fluidization velocity and a decrease in the number of bubbles and fast particles in the bed. Changes in liquid loading alter hydrodynamics to a greater extent than changes in surface tension or viscosity. Keeping U/Umf at a constant value of 1.5 produced fairly similar hydrodynamics across different wetting conditions. The detailed results presented provide an important dataset for assessment of the validity of assumptions in computational models. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 64: 2958–2971, 2018

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging is used to generate snapshots of particle concentration and velocity fields in gas–solid fluidized beds into which small amounts of liquid are injected. Three regimes of bed behavior (stationary, channeling, and bubbling) are mapped based on superficial velocity and liquid loading. Images are analyzed to determine quantitatively the number of bubbles, the bubble diameter, bed height, and the distribution of particle speeds under different wetting conditions. The cohesion and dissipation provided by liquid bridges cause an increase in the minimum fluidization velocity and a decrease in the number of bubbles and fast particles in the bed. Changes in liquid loading alter hydrodynamics to a greater extent than changes in surface tension or viscosity. Keeping U/Umf at a constant value of 1.5 produced fairly similar hydrodynamics across different wetting conditions. The detailed results presented provide an important dataset for assessment of the validity of assumptions in computational models. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 64: 2958–2971, 2018

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Biotechnology, Environmental Engineering, General Chemical Engineering
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:07 Dec 2018 10:20
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:55
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0001-1541
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/aic.16036
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID200021_153290
  • : Project TitleAdvancement of magnetic resonance imaging and discrete element models to probe the dynamics of fluidised beds with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution

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