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Survival after non-traumatic spinal cord injury: evidence from a population-based rehabilitation cohort in Switzerland


Buzzell, A; Chamberlain, J D; Gmünder, H P; Hug, K; Jordan, X; Schubert, M; Brinkhof, M W G; SwiSCI Study Group (2019). Survival after non-traumatic spinal cord injury: evidence from a population-based rehabilitation cohort in Switzerland. Spinal Cord, 57(4):267-275.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN Observational cohort study. OBJECTIVE To investigate survival and life expectancy after NTSCI in Switzerland according to etiology. SETTING Specialized rehabilitation centers in Switzerland. METHODS Longitudinal data from the Swiss Spinal Cord Injury (SwiSCI) medical records study were used. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and life expectancies were estimated using flexible parametric survival modeling. RESULTS One thousand four hundred and fifty individuals were admitted to first rehabilitation for NTSCI between 1990 and 2011, contributing 6137 cumulative person-years at risk and 528 deaths. With reference to persons with a degenerative disc disorder, the HR for mortality in individuals with NTSCIs from infections was 1.42 (95% CI 0.99-2.04), while risk in those with NTSCIs from vascular disorders was 1.28 (95% CI 0.97-1.68). Mortality risk was most pronounced in individuals with NTSCIs from malignant neoplasms (HR 6.32, 95% CI 4.79-8.34). Exemplified for males with an attained age of 60 years, a malignant etiology was associated with 1.7 life years remaining (LYR), as compared to 10.1 LYR for non-malignant etiologies. Males with an attained age of 60 years and a degenerative disc etiology were estimated to have 12.9 LYR. CONCLUSIONS This study contributes an evidence base for risk factors of mortality after NTSCI, reducing a considerable knowledge gap in survival after NTSCI. Survival and life expectancy estimates were highly differential between etiological groups, indicating a need for a heterogeneous clinical approach and dynamic health-care provisions for this growing population.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN Observational cohort study. OBJECTIVE To investigate survival and life expectancy after NTSCI in Switzerland according to etiology. SETTING Specialized rehabilitation centers in Switzerland. METHODS Longitudinal data from the Swiss Spinal Cord Injury (SwiSCI) medical records study were used. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and life expectancies were estimated using flexible parametric survival modeling. RESULTS One thousand four hundred and fifty individuals were admitted to first rehabilitation for NTSCI between 1990 and 2011, contributing 6137 cumulative person-years at risk and 528 deaths. With reference to persons with a degenerative disc disorder, the HR for mortality in individuals with NTSCIs from infections was 1.42 (95% CI 0.99-2.04), while risk in those with NTSCIs from vascular disorders was 1.28 (95% CI 0.97-1.68). Mortality risk was most pronounced in individuals with NTSCIs from malignant neoplasms (HR 6.32, 95% CI 4.79-8.34). Exemplified for males with an attained age of 60 years, a malignant etiology was associated with 1.7 life years remaining (LYR), as compared to 10.1 LYR for non-malignant etiologies. Males with an attained age of 60 years and a degenerative disc etiology were estimated to have 12.9 LYR. CONCLUSIONS This study contributes an evidence base for risk factors of mortality after NTSCI, reducing a considerable knowledge gap in survival after NTSCI. Survival and life expectancy estimates were highly differential between etiological groups, indicating a need for a heterogeneous clinical approach and dynamic health-care provisions for this growing population.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 April 2019
Deposited On:07 Dec 2018 13:54
Last Modified:06 Apr 2019 01:02
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1362-4393
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41393-018-0212-x
PubMed ID:30413804

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