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Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Knee at 7 T: Optimization of Fat Suppression


Wyss, Michael; Manoliu, Andrei; Marcon, Magda; Spinner, Georg; Luechinger, Roger; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Andreisek, Gustav (2019). Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Knee at 7 T: Optimization of Fat Suppression. Investigative Radiology, 54(3):160-168.

Abstract

PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and performance of different fat suppression techniques for clinical 7 T knee magnetic resonance imaging including the slice-selective gradient reversal (SSGR) technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS This article is an ethical board-approved prospective study with written informed consent from 8 volunteers (mean, 31 ± 4 years). It included fat phantom and knee magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T (Magnetom Skyra; Siemens Healthcare) and at 7 T (Achieva, Philips Healthcare). At 3 T, an axial proton density-weighted turbo spin echo sequence with spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR) was acquired. At 7 T, a series of 5 proton density-weighted turbo spin echo sequences was acquired: (a) without fat suppression, (b) with spectral presaturation with inversion recovery (SPIR), (c) with SPAIR, (d) with SSGR, and (e) with the combination of SSGR + SPIR. Additional noise scans allowed pixelwise calculation of signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio maps. Quantitative data at 7 T were compared with each other but not to 3 T. Two independent radiologists evaluated overall image quality, homogeneity and grade of fat suppression, and the delineation between 2 adjacent structures. Results were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank and paired sample t tests. RESULTS Relative signal-to-noise ratios of fat demonstrated that the SPIR technique reduced the fat signal to 45% ± 5.4%; SPAIR, 18% ± 1.2%; SSGR, 14% ± 1.1%; and SSGR + SPIR, 11% ± 0.3%. Contrast-to-noise ratio showed superior contrast between muscle-fat (P < 0.001) and fluid-fat (P ≤ 0.001) for SSGR and SSGR + SPIR. The radiologists rated the overall image quality higher at 7 T than 3 T. The homogeneity and grade of fat suppression as well as the delineation between 2 different (adjacent) structures were rated best for SSGR + SPIR. CONCLUSIONS At 7 T, fat saturation for clinical knee imaging using SSGR and the combination of SSGR + SPIR was superior compared with standard methods based on spectrally selective radiofrequency pulses.

Abstract

PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and performance of different fat suppression techniques for clinical 7 T knee magnetic resonance imaging including the slice-selective gradient reversal (SSGR) technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS This article is an ethical board-approved prospective study with written informed consent from 8 volunteers (mean, 31 ± 4 years). It included fat phantom and knee magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T (Magnetom Skyra; Siemens Healthcare) and at 7 T (Achieva, Philips Healthcare). At 3 T, an axial proton density-weighted turbo spin echo sequence with spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR) was acquired. At 7 T, a series of 5 proton density-weighted turbo spin echo sequences was acquired: (a) without fat suppression, (b) with spectral presaturation with inversion recovery (SPIR), (c) with SPAIR, (d) with SSGR, and (e) with the combination of SSGR + SPIR. Additional noise scans allowed pixelwise calculation of signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio maps. Quantitative data at 7 T were compared with each other but not to 3 T. Two independent radiologists evaluated overall image quality, homogeneity and grade of fat suppression, and the delineation between 2 adjacent structures. Results were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank and paired sample t tests. RESULTS Relative signal-to-noise ratios of fat demonstrated that the SPIR technique reduced the fat signal to 45% ± 5.4%; SPAIR, 18% ± 1.2%; SSGR, 14% ± 1.1%; and SSGR + SPIR, 11% ± 0.3%. Contrast-to-noise ratio showed superior contrast between muscle-fat (P < 0.001) and fluid-fat (P ≤ 0.001) for SSGR and SSGR + SPIR. The radiologists rated the overall image quality higher at 7 T than 3 T. The homogeneity and grade of fat suppression as well as the delineation between 2 different (adjacent) structures were rated best for SSGR + SPIR. CONCLUSIONS At 7 T, fat saturation for clinical knee imaging using SSGR and the combination of SSGR + SPIR was superior compared with standard methods based on spectrally selective radiofrequency pulses.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 March 2019
Deposited On:13 Dec 2018 09:22
Last Modified:03 Feb 2019 02:04
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0020-9996
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/RLI.0000000000000523
PubMed ID:30418261

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