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Impact of human mesenchymal cells of different body site origins on the maturation of dermo-epidermal skin substitutes


Michalak-Micka, Katarzyna; Klar, Agnes S; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Reichmann, Ernst; Meuli, Martin; Biedermann, Thomas (2019). Impact of human mesenchymal cells of different body site origins on the maturation of dermo-epidermal skin substitutes. Pediatric Surgery International, 35(1):121-127.

Abstract

AIM OF THE STUDY The use of autologous bio-engineered dermo-epidermal skin substitutes (DESS) yields a pivotal opportunity to cover large skin defects in human patients. These skin grafts consist of both epidermal and dermal compartments necessary for robust and permanent functional wound closure. In this study, we investigated the impact of mesenchymal cells derived from different body site origins on the expression pattern of diverse markers within DESS.
METHODS Human keratinocytes were obtained from interfollicular epidermis, and mesenchymal cells were isolated from foreskin, palmar skin, fat tissue, and tonsils. After expansion, epidermal cells were seeded on collagen I hydrogels containing stromal cells. These human DESS were transplanted on the back of immune-incompetent rats. After 3 weeks, transplants were excised and analyzed using immunohistology techniques.
MAIN RESULTS The macroscopic appearance of skin grafts containing tonsil, fat tissue, or palmar derived mesenchymal cells, was similar to substitutes with foreskin derived dermal fibroblasts. All skin grafts had a strong membrane-localized expression of Lingo-1 in the epidermis. Additionally, we observed an intense expression of transglutaminase 5 in upper epidermal cell layers of the skin grafts confirming a proper keratinocyte differentiation. Tropoelastin was localized throughout the dermal compartments and tightly in contact with the dermo-epidermal junction suggesting an advanced maturation of all skin grafts.
CONCLUSIONS Our data implicate that stromal cells derived from tonsil, fat tissue, and palmar skin can assume fibroblast functions supporting keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. These findings indicate that distinct types of mesenchymal cells can be clinically used for skin engineering purposes.

Abstract

AIM OF THE STUDY The use of autologous bio-engineered dermo-epidermal skin substitutes (DESS) yields a pivotal opportunity to cover large skin defects in human patients. These skin grafts consist of both epidermal and dermal compartments necessary for robust and permanent functional wound closure. In this study, we investigated the impact of mesenchymal cells derived from different body site origins on the expression pattern of diverse markers within DESS.
METHODS Human keratinocytes were obtained from interfollicular epidermis, and mesenchymal cells were isolated from foreskin, palmar skin, fat tissue, and tonsils. After expansion, epidermal cells were seeded on collagen I hydrogels containing stromal cells. These human DESS were transplanted on the back of immune-incompetent rats. After 3 weeks, transplants were excised and analyzed using immunohistology techniques.
MAIN RESULTS The macroscopic appearance of skin grafts containing tonsil, fat tissue, or palmar derived mesenchymal cells, was similar to substitutes with foreskin derived dermal fibroblasts. All skin grafts had a strong membrane-localized expression of Lingo-1 in the epidermis. Additionally, we observed an intense expression of transglutaminase 5 in upper epidermal cell layers of the skin grafts confirming a proper keratinocyte differentiation. Tropoelastin was localized throughout the dermal compartments and tightly in contact with the dermo-epidermal junction suggesting an advanced maturation of all skin grafts.
CONCLUSIONS Our data implicate that stromal cells derived from tonsil, fat tissue, and palmar skin can assume fibroblast functions supporting keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. These findings indicate that distinct types of mesenchymal cells can be clinically used for skin engineering purposes.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 January 2019
Deposited On:13 Dec 2018 13:18
Last Modified:10 Jan 2019 02:05
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0179-0358
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00383-018-4383-5
PubMed ID:30382375

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