Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

First report of foregut microbial community in proboscis monkeys: are diverse forests a reservoir for diverse microbiomes?


Hayakawa, Takashi; Nathan, Senthilvel K S S; Stark, Danica J; Saldivar, Diana A Ramirez; Sipangkui, Rosa; Goossens, Benoit; Tuuga, Augustine; Clauss, Marcus; Sawada, Akiko; Fukuda, Shinji; Imai, Hiroo; Matsuda, Ikki (2018). First report of foregut microbial community in proboscis monkeys: are diverse forests a reservoir for diverse microbiomes? Environmental Microbiology Reports, 10(6):655-662.

Abstract

Foregut fermentation is well known to occur in a wide range of mammalian species and in a single bird spe- cies. Yet, the foregut microbial community of free- ranging, foregut-fermenting monkeys, that is, colo- bines, has not been investigated so far. We analysed the foregut microbiomes in four free-ranging probos- cis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) from two different trop- ical habitats with varying plant diversity (mangrove and riverine forests), in an individual from a semi- free-ranging setting with supplemental feeding, and in an individual from captivity, using high-throughput sequencing based on 16S ribosomal RNA genes. We found a decrease in foregut microbial diversity from a diverse natural habitat (riverine forest) to a low diverse natural habitat (mangrove forest), to human- related environments. Of a total of 2700 bacterial oper- ational taxonomic units (OTUs) detected in all envi- ronments, only 153 OTUs were shared across all individuals, suggesting that they were not influenced by diet or habitat. These OTUs were dominated by Fir- micutes and Proteobacteria. The relative abundance of the habitat-specific microbial communities showed a wide range of differences among living environ- ments, although such bacterial communities appeared to be dominated by Firmicutes and Bacter- oidetes, suggesting that those phyla are key to under- standing the adaptive strategy in proboscis monkeys living in different habitats.

Abstract

Foregut fermentation is well known to occur in a wide range of mammalian species and in a single bird spe- cies. Yet, the foregut microbial community of free- ranging, foregut-fermenting monkeys, that is, colo- bines, has not been investigated so far. We analysed the foregut microbiomes in four free-ranging probos- cis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) from two different trop- ical habitats with varying plant diversity (mangrove and riverine forests), in an individual from a semi- free-ranging setting with supplemental feeding, and in an individual from captivity, using high-throughput sequencing based on 16S ribosomal RNA genes. We found a decrease in foregut microbial diversity from a diverse natural habitat (riverine forest) to a low diverse natural habitat (mangrove forest), to human- related environments. Of a total of 2700 bacterial oper- ational taxonomic units (OTUs) detected in all envi- ronments, only 153 OTUs were shared across all individuals, suggesting that they were not influenced by diet or habitat. These OTUs were dominated by Fir- micutes and Proteobacteria. The relative abundance of the habitat-specific microbial communities showed a wide range of differences among living environ- ments, although such bacterial communities appeared to be dominated by Firmicutes and Bacter- oidetes, suggesting that those phyla are key to under- standing the adaptive strategy in proboscis monkeys living in different habitats.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
4 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 19 Dec 2018
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords:Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous), Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Language:English
Date:1 December 2018
Deposited On:19 Dec 2018 15:35
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 23:58
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1758-2229
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-2229.12677

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members