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Factors associated with time from first-symptoms to diagnosis and treatment initiation of Multiple Sclerosis in Switzerland


Kaufmann, Marco; Kuhle, Jens; Puhan, Milo A; Kamm, Christian P; Chan, Andrew; Salmen, Anke; Kesselring, Jürg; Calabrese, Pasquale; Gobbi, Claudio; Pot, Caroline; Steinemann, Nina; Rodgers, Stephanie; von Wyl, Viktor (2018). Factors associated with time from first-symptoms to diagnosis and treatment initiation of Multiple Sclerosis in Switzerland. Multiple Sclerosis Journal – Experimental, Translational and Clinical, 4(4):2055217318814562.

Abstract

Background: Recent studies emphasise the importance of timely diagnosis and early initiation of disease-modifying treatment in the long-term prognosis of multiple sclerosis.
Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate factors associated with extended time to diagnosis and time to disease-modifying treatment initiation in the Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Registry.
Methods: We used retrospective data (diagnoses 1996-2017) of the survey-based Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Registry and fitted logistic regression models (extended time to diagnosis ≥2 years from first symptoms, extended time to disease-modifying treatment initiation ≥1 year from diagnosis) with demographic and a priori defined variables.
Results: Our study, based on 996 persons with multiple sclerosis, suggests that 40% had an extended time to diagnosis, and extended time to disease-modifying treatment initiation was seen in 23%. Factors associated with extended time to diagnosis were primary progressive multiple sclerosis (odds ratio (OR) 5.09 (3.12-8.49)), diagnosis setting outside of hospital (neurologist (private practice) OR 1.54 (1.16-2.05)) and more uncommon first symptoms (per additional symptom OR 1.17 (1.06-1.30)). Older age at onset (per additional 5 years OR 0.84 (0.78-0.90)) and gait problems (OR 0.65 (0.47-0.89)) or paresthesia (OR 0.72 (0.54-0.95)) as first symptoms were associated with shorter time to diagnosis. Extended time to disease-modifying treatment initiation was associated with older age at diagnosis (per additional 5 years OR 1.18 (1.09-1.29)). In more recent years, time to diagnosis and time to disease-modifying treatment initiation tended to be shorter.
Conclusions: Even in recent periods, substantial and partially systematic variation regarding time to diagnosis and time to disease-modifying treatment initiation remains. With the emerging paradigm of early treatment, the residual variation should be monitored carefully.

Abstract

Background: Recent studies emphasise the importance of timely diagnosis and early initiation of disease-modifying treatment in the long-term prognosis of multiple sclerosis.
Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate factors associated with extended time to diagnosis and time to disease-modifying treatment initiation in the Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Registry.
Methods: We used retrospective data (diagnoses 1996-2017) of the survey-based Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Registry and fitted logistic regression models (extended time to diagnosis ≥2 years from first symptoms, extended time to disease-modifying treatment initiation ≥1 year from diagnosis) with demographic and a priori defined variables.
Results: Our study, based on 996 persons with multiple sclerosis, suggests that 40% had an extended time to diagnosis, and extended time to disease-modifying treatment initiation was seen in 23%. Factors associated with extended time to diagnosis were primary progressive multiple sclerosis (odds ratio (OR) 5.09 (3.12-8.49)), diagnosis setting outside of hospital (neurologist (private practice) OR 1.54 (1.16-2.05)) and more uncommon first symptoms (per additional symptom OR 1.17 (1.06-1.30)). Older age at onset (per additional 5 years OR 0.84 (0.78-0.90)) and gait problems (OR 0.65 (0.47-0.89)) or paresthesia (OR 0.72 (0.54-0.95)) as first symptoms were associated with shorter time to diagnosis. Extended time to disease-modifying treatment initiation was associated with older age at diagnosis (per additional 5 years OR 1.18 (1.09-1.29)). In more recent years, time to diagnosis and time to disease-modifying treatment initiation tended to be shorter.
Conclusions: Even in recent periods, substantial and partially systematic variation regarding time to diagnosis and time to disease-modifying treatment initiation remains. With the emerging paradigm of early treatment, the residual variation should be monitored carefully.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 October 2018
Deposited On:04 Jan 2019 14:43
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 08:38
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:2055-2173
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/2055217318814562
PubMed ID:30559972

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