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Recommended outcome measures for inpatient rehabilitation of multiple sclerosis are not appropriate for the patients with substantially impaired mobility


Barin, Laura; Vaney, Claude; Puhan, Milo Alan; von Wyl, Viktor (2018). Recommended outcome measures for inpatient rehabilitation of multiple sclerosis are not appropriate for the patients with substantially impaired mobility. Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 22:108-114.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
In multiple sclerosis (MS) rehabilitation, most currently used outcome measures were validated in patients with a relapsing remitting MS and mild to moderate impairments. We aimed to assess whether these measures were also adequate in more impaired patients, frequently encountered in those with progressive MS (PMS).

METHODS
Outcome measurements were extracted from medical records of 229 patients with PMS undergoing 3 weeks of routine inpatient rehabilitation between 2011 and 2015. We assessed the acceptability of Nine-Hole Peg Test (9HPT), Timed 25-Foot Walk (T25FW), 2-Minute Walk Test (2MWT), Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) by analysing their statistical distributions, concurrent validity by comparing Spearman correlations with pre-specified hypotheses, and responsiveness across impairment status by calculating standardized response means.

RESULTS
Our concurrent validity hypotheses were mainly satisfied. However, all outcome measures had skewed distributions, showed low variability, and thus were inadequately discriminative. Moreover, 9HPT was never responsive across the impairment states, whereas the T25FW was responsive for mildly impaired patients, and the 2MWT for mild to moderate MS, respectively. Generic multi-items measures such as RMI and FIM-motor were adequately responsive for all severity levels.

CONCLUSIONS
Currently used outcome measures are inadequate for patients with impaired mobility, and there is a dire need of specifically designed outcome measures for routine care that are less burdensome and short-term responsive.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
In multiple sclerosis (MS) rehabilitation, most currently used outcome measures were validated in patients with a relapsing remitting MS and mild to moderate impairments. We aimed to assess whether these measures were also adequate in more impaired patients, frequently encountered in those with progressive MS (PMS).

METHODS
Outcome measurements were extracted from medical records of 229 patients with PMS undergoing 3 weeks of routine inpatient rehabilitation between 2011 and 2015. We assessed the acceptability of Nine-Hole Peg Test (9HPT), Timed 25-Foot Walk (T25FW), 2-Minute Walk Test (2MWT), Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) by analysing their statistical distributions, concurrent validity by comparing Spearman correlations with pre-specified hypotheses, and responsiveness across impairment status by calculating standardized response means.

RESULTS
Our concurrent validity hypotheses were mainly satisfied. However, all outcome measures had skewed distributions, showed low variability, and thus were inadequately discriminative. Moreover, 9HPT was never responsive across the impairment states, whereas the T25FW was responsive for mildly impaired patients, and the 2MWT for mild to moderate MS, respectively. Generic multi-items measures such as RMI and FIM-motor were adequately responsive for all severity levels.

CONCLUSIONS
Currently used outcome measures are inadequate for patients with impaired mobility, and there is a dire need of specifically designed outcome measures for routine care that are less burdensome and short-term responsive.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2018
Deposited On:04 Jan 2019 14:26
Last Modified:04 Apr 2019 00:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2211-0348
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2018.04.001
PubMed ID:29655044

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