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Surprisingly good outcome in antenatal diagnosis of severe hydrocephalus related to CCDC88C deficiency


Wallis, Mathew; Baumer, Alessandra; Smaili, Wiam; Jaouad, Imane Cherkaoui; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Jacobson, Erica; Bowyer, Lucy; Mowat, David; Rauch, Anita (2018). Surprisingly good outcome in antenatal diagnosis of severe hydrocephalus related to CCDC88C deficiency. European Journal of Medical Genetics, 61(4):189-196.

Abstract

Non-syndromic congenital hydrocephalus is aetiologically diverse and while a genetic cause is frequently suspected, it often cannot be confirmed. The most common genetic cause is L1CAM-related X-linked hydrocephalus and that explains only 5%-10% of all male cases. This underlines a current limitation in our understanding of the genetic burden of non-syndromic congenital hydrocephalus, especially for those cases with likely autosomal recessive inheritance. Additionally, the prognosis for most cases of severe congenital hydrocephalus is poor, with most of the surviving infants displaying significant intellectual impairment despite surgical intervention. It is for this reason that couples with an antenatal diagnosis of severe hydrocephalus are given the option, and may opt, for termination of the pregnancy. We present two families with CCDC88C-related recessive congenital hydrocephalus with children who had severe hydrocephalus. Those individuals who were shunted within the first few weeks of life, who did not require multiple surgical revisions, and who had a more distal truncating variant of the CCDC88C gene met their early childhood developmental milestones in some cases. This suggests that children with CCDC88C-related autosomal recessive hydrocephalus can have normal developmental outcomes under certain circumstances. We recommend CCDC88C analysis in cases of severe non-syndromic congenital hydrocephalus, especially when aqueduct stenosis with or without a medial diverticulum is seen, in order to aid prognosis discussion.

Abstract

Non-syndromic congenital hydrocephalus is aetiologically diverse and while a genetic cause is frequently suspected, it often cannot be confirmed. The most common genetic cause is L1CAM-related X-linked hydrocephalus and that explains only 5%-10% of all male cases. This underlines a current limitation in our understanding of the genetic burden of non-syndromic congenital hydrocephalus, especially for those cases with likely autosomal recessive inheritance. Additionally, the prognosis for most cases of severe congenital hydrocephalus is poor, with most of the surviving infants displaying significant intellectual impairment despite surgical intervention. It is for this reason that couples with an antenatal diagnosis of severe hydrocephalus are given the option, and may opt, for termination of the pregnancy. We present two families with CCDC88C-related recessive congenital hydrocephalus with children who had severe hydrocephalus. Those individuals who were shunted within the first few weeks of life, who did not require multiple surgical revisions, and who had a more distal truncating variant of the CCDC88C gene met their early childhood developmental milestones in some cases. This suggests that children with CCDC88C-related autosomal recessive hydrocephalus can have normal developmental outcomes under certain circumstances. We recommend CCDC88C analysis in cases of severe non-syndromic congenital hydrocephalus, especially when aqueduct stenosis with or without a medial diverticulum is seen, in order to aid prognosis discussion.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Genetics
Health Sciences > Genetics (clinical)
Language:English
Date:April 2018
Deposited On:09 Jan 2019 13:11
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 08:49
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1769-7212
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2017.12.002
PubMed ID:29225145

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