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Virtual reconstruction of paranasal sinuses from CT data: A feasibility study for forensic application


Gach, P; Tuchtan-Torrents, Lucile; Delteil, C; Adalian, P; Piercecchi, M D; Ebert, Lars C; Gorincour, G (2019). Virtual reconstruction of paranasal sinuses from CT data: A feasibility study for forensic application. Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, 100(3):163-168.

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to report the feasibility of computed modelization and reconstitution of the paranasal sinuses, before and after trauma, from CT data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We modeled and reconstructed the paranasal sinuses of two patients (A and B), before and after trauma, using two different softwares (3DSlicer® and Blender®). Both patients had different numbers and locations of fractures. The 3DSlicer® software was used to create a 3D model from CT data. We then imported the 3D data into the Blender® software, to reconstruct and compare the dimensions of the paranasal sinuses before and after trauma. RESULTS: The 3 fragments of patient A and the 7 fragments of patient B could be repositioned in the pre-traumatic configuration. Distance measurements proved to be similar between pre- and post-traumatic 3D volumes. CONCLUSION: After simple trauma, bone facial anatomy reconstruction is manually feasible. The whole procedure could benefit from automatization through machine learning. However, this feasibility must be confirmed on more severely fractured paranasal sinuses, to consider an application in forensic identification.

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to report the feasibility of computed modelization and reconstitution of the paranasal sinuses, before and after trauma, from CT data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We modeled and reconstructed the paranasal sinuses of two patients (A and B), before and after trauma, using two different softwares (3DSlicer® and Blender®). Both patients had different numbers and locations of fractures. The 3DSlicer® software was used to create a 3D model from CT data. We then imported the 3D data into the Blender® software, to reconstruct and compare the dimensions of the paranasal sinuses before and after trauma. RESULTS: The 3 fragments of patient A and the 7 fragments of patient B could be repositioned in the pre-traumatic configuration. Distance measurements proved to be similar between pre- and post-traumatic 3D volumes. CONCLUSION: After simple trauma, bone facial anatomy reconstruction is manually feasible. The whole procedure could benefit from automatization through machine learning. However, this feasibility must be confirmed on more severely fractured paranasal sinuses, to consider an application in forensic identification.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Legal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:340 Law
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Radiological and Ultrasound Technology, Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 March 2019
Deposited On:03 Jan 2019 12:03
Last Modified:29 Apr 2019 07:01
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2211-5684
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.diii.2018.11.011
PubMed ID:30553743

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