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Three-dimensional double helical DNA structure directly revealed from its X-ray fiber diffraction pattern by iterative phase retrieval


Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Fink, Hans-Werner (2018). Three-dimensional double helical DNA structure directly revealed from its X-ray fiber diffraction pattern by iterative phase retrieval. Optics Express, 26(23):30991-31017.

Abstract

Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) allows the retrieval of an isolated object’s structure, such as a macromolecule, from its diffraction pattern. CDI requires the fulfillment of two conditions: the imaging radiation must be coherent and the object must be isolated. We discuss that it is possible to directly retrieve the molecular structure from its diffraction pattern, which was acquired neither with coherent radiation nor from an individual molecule. This is provided that the molecule exhibits periodicity in one direction, as in the case of fiber diffraction. We demonstrate that, when we apply iterative phase retrieval methods to a fiber diffraction pattern, the repeating unit; that is, the molecule structure, can directly be reconstructed without any prior modeling. For example, we recover the the DNA double helix’s structure in three-dimensions from its two-dimensional X-ray fiber diffraction pattern, Photograph (Photo) 51, which was acquired in Raymond Gosling and Rosalind Franklin’s famous experiment at a resolution of 3.4 Å.

Abstract

Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) allows the retrieval of an isolated object’s structure, such as a macromolecule, from its diffraction pattern. CDI requires the fulfillment of two conditions: the imaging radiation must be coherent and the object must be isolated. We discuss that it is possible to directly retrieve the molecular structure from its diffraction pattern, which was acquired neither with coherent radiation nor from an individual molecule. This is provided that the molecule exhibits periodicity in one direction, as in the case of fiber diffraction. We demonstrate that, when we apply iterative phase retrieval methods to a fiber diffraction pattern, the repeating unit; that is, the molecule structure, can directly be reconstructed without any prior modeling. For example, we recover the the DNA double helix’s structure in three-dimensions from its two-dimensional X-ray fiber diffraction pattern, Photograph (Photo) 51, which was acquired in Raymond Gosling and Rosalind Franklin’s famous experiment at a resolution of 3.4 Å.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Physics Institute
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Uncontrolled Keywords:Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
Language:English
Date:12 November 2018
Deposited On:16 Jan 2019 16:11
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:02
Publisher:Optical Society of America
ISSN:1094-4087
Additional Information:This paper was published in Optics Express and is made available as an electronic reprint with the permission of OSA. The paper can be found at the following URL on the OSA website: https://doi.org/10.1364/OE.26.030991. Systematic or multiple reproduction or distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law.
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1364/oe.26.030991

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