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Altered time judgements highlight common mechanisms of time and space perception


Huberle, Elisabeth; Brugger, Peter (2018). Altered time judgements highlight common mechanisms of time and space perception. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 35(8):458-470.

Abstract

Space, numbers and time share similar processing mechanisms mediated by parietal cortex. In parallel to the spatial representation of numbers along a horizontal line, temporal information is mapped on a horizontal axis with short intervals (and the past) represented to the left of long intervals (and the future). Little is known about the representation of time in the presence of visuo-spatial deficits. We here report two experiments on the comparative judgment of time. Experiment 1 required patients with left-sided neglect to indicate which of two consecutively presented silent intervals was longer. Their judgments were better if the first interval was longer and they judged the first interval longer on trials in which the two intervals were equally long. These results were not present in right-hemispheric damaged patients without neglect and healthy controls. They are in line with a previously reported finding in a single patient with neglect, but not readily compatible with findings of neglect patients' comparative length judgments. In Experiment 2, healthy participants' performance on an identical task improved for trials with a first-longer interval after caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) of the right ear with warm water.

Abstract

Space, numbers and time share similar processing mechanisms mediated by parietal cortex. In parallel to the spatial representation of numbers along a horizontal line, temporal information is mapped on a horizontal axis with short intervals (and the past) represented to the left of long intervals (and the future). Little is known about the representation of time in the presence of visuo-spatial deficits. We here report two experiments on the comparative judgment of time. Experiment 1 required patients with left-sided neglect to indicate which of two consecutively presented silent intervals was longer. Their judgments were better if the first interval was longer and they judged the first interval longer on trials in which the two intervals were equally long. These results were not present in right-hemispheric damaged patients without neglect and healthy controls. They are in line with a previously reported finding in a single patient with neglect, but not readily compatible with findings of neglect patients' comparative length judgments. In Experiment 2, healthy participants' performance on an identical task improved for trials with a first-longer interval after caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) of the right ear with warm water.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > Developmental and Educational Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:December 2018
Deposited On:25 Jan 2019 10:02
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 08:59
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0264-3294
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/02643294.2018.1549027
PubMed ID:30497331

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