Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Use of repellents by travellers: A randomised, quantitative analysis of applied dosage and an evaluation of knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP)


Hasler, Thomas; Fehr, Jan; Held, Ulrike; Schlagenhauf, Patricia (2019). Use of repellents by travellers: A randomised, quantitative analysis of applied dosage and an evaluation of knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP). Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, 28:27-33.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Prevention of arthropod-borne infections hinges on bite prevention. We aimed to investigate travellers' use of repellents. METHODS We measured the amount of applied repellent with a spray containing 30% DEET and 20% Icaridin versus a lotion with 20% Icaridin alone. We calculated the concentration of active ingredient reached on the skin and evaluated formulation acceptability. The travellers completed a questionnaire evaluating Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice (KAP) to anti-vectorial protective measures (AVPM). RESULTS Some 200 volunteers travelling to mosquito borne infection endemic areas were recruited. The mean concentration of active substance achieved on the skin of the left arm was 0.52 mg/cm of DEET/Icaridin spray versus 0.21 mg/cm of Icaridin lotion. These levels are below the recommended protective dose (1 mg/cm) for each formulation. Women were significantly more likely to apply a higher, protective dose of repellent. Travellers to Africa, women and older participants showed higher projected adherence to AVPM. CONCLUSIONS Only 2.5% of recruited travellers applied the recommended protective dose of repellent. Women and older travellers are the most adherent users of repellents. The pre-travel health consultation should provide more information on the application quantity and correct use of repellents.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Prevention of arthropod-borne infections hinges on bite prevention. We aimed to investigate travellers' use of repellents. METHODS We measured the amount of applied repellent with a spray containing 30% DEET and 20% Icaridin versus a lotion with 20% Icaridin alone. We calculated the concentration of active ingredient reached on the skin and evaluated formulation acceptability. The travellers completed a questionnaire evaluating Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice (KAP) to anti-vectorial protective measures (AVPM). RESULTS Some 200 volunteers travelling to mosquito borne infection endemic areas were recruited. The mean concentration of active substance achieved on the skin of the left arm was 0.52 mg/cm of DEET/Icaridin spray versus 0.21 mg/cm of Icaridin lotion. These levels are below the recommended protective dose (1 mg/cm) for each formulation. Women were significantly more likely to apply a higher, protective dose of repellent. Travellers to Africa, women and older participants showed higher projected adherence to AVPM. CONCLUSIONS Only 2.5% of recruited travellers applied the recommended protective dose of repellent. Women and older travellers are the most adherent users of repellents. The pre-travel health consultation should provide more information on the application quantity and correct use of repellents.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

52 downloads since deposited on 29 Jan 2019
47 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 March 2019
Deposited On:29 Jan 2019 11:36
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1477-8939
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tmaid.2018.12.007
PubMed ID:30578847

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Use of repellents by travellers: A randomised, quantitative analysis of applied dosage and an evaluation of knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP)'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 558kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)