Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Artificial sweetener reduces nociceptive reaction in term newborn infants


Bucher, H U; Baumgartner, R; Bucher, N; Seiler, M; Fauchère, J C (2000). Artificial sweetener reduces nociceptive reaction in term newborn infants. Early Human Development, 59(1):51-60.

Abstract

Background: Sucrose has been shown to have an analgesic effect in preterm and term neonates. Sucrose, however, has a high osmolarity and may have deleterious effects in infants with fructose intolerance. Furthermore, it may favour caries. We therefore investigated the effects of a commercially available artificial sweetener (10 parts cyclamate and 1 part saccharin), glycine (sweet amino acid) or breast milk in reducing reaction to pain as compared with a placebo. Subjects: Eighty healthy term infants, four days old, with normal birth weight. Interventions: The infants were randomly assigned to one of four groups: 2 ml sweetener, glycine, expressed breast milk or water were given 2 min before a heel prick for the Guthrie test. The procedure was filmed with a video camera and analysed by two observers who did not know which medication the infant had received. Results: Using a multivariate regression analysis, the following variables had significant correlation with relative crying time and recovery time: behavioural state before the intervention, the pricking nurse, and the type of medication. Relative crying time and recovery time were significantly less in the sweetener group but not in the glycine and the breast milk group. Conclusions: The artificial sweetener used in our study reduces pain reaction to a heel prick in term neonates, and thus provides an alternative to sucrose. In contrast, glycine tends to increase pain reaction whereas breast milk has no effect.

Abstract

Background: Sucrose has been shown to have an analgesic effect in preterm and term neonates. Sucrose, however, has a high osmolarity and may have deleterious effects in infants with fructose intolerance. Furthermore, it may favour caries. We therefore investigated the effects of a commercially available artificial sweetener (10 parts cyclamate and 1 part saccharin), glycine (sweet amino acid) or breast milk in reducing reaction to pain as compared with a placebo. Subjects: Eighty healthy term infants, four days old, with normal birth weight. Interventions: The infants were randomly assigned to one of four groups: 2 ml sweetener, glycine, expressed breast milk or water were given 2 min before a heel prick for the Guthrie test. The procedure was filmed with a video camera and analysed by two observers who did not know which medication the infant had received. Results: Using a multivariate regression analysis, the following variables had significant correlation with relative crying time and recovery time: behavioural state before the intervention, the pricking nurse, and the type of medication. Relative crying time and recovery time were significantly less in the sweetener group but not in the glycine and the breast milk group. Conclusions: The artificial sweetener used in our study reduces pain reaction to a heel prick in term neonates, and thus provides an alternative to sucrose. In contrast, glycine tends to increase pain reaction whereas breast milk has no effect.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
37 citations in Web of Science®
42 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2000
Deposited On:31 Jan 2019 15:10
Last Modified:17 Sep 2019 19:54
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0378-3782
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0378-3782(00)00085-2
PubMed ID:10962167

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library