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The use of home remedies and complementary health approaches in endometriosis


Schwartz, Alexandra Sabrina Kohl; Gross, Elvira; Geraedts, Kirsten; Rauchfuss, Martina; Wölfler, Monika Maria; Häberlin, Felix; von Orelli, Stephanie; Eberhard, Markus; Imesch, Patrick; Imthurn, Bruno; Leeners, Brigitte (2019). The use of home remedies and complementary health approaches in endometriosis. Reproductive Biomedicine Online, 38(2):260-271.

Abstract

RESEARCH QUESTION
Conventional treatments are often associated with adverse effects and endometriosis pain symptoms may reoccur despite treatment. Consequently, many women use complementary health approaches (CHA) and home remedies (HR) to relieve their pain. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency and the subjectively perceived efficacy of CHA/HR use by women affected by endometriosis.

DESIGN
Retrospective evaluation using medical charts and a questionnaire. Women recruited in hospitals and in self-help groups were asked about the use of 'topical heat', 'repose/relaxation', 'movement/massages', 'homeopathy/phytotherapy', 'acupuncture/traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)' and 'kinesiology/physiotherapy'.

RESULTS
From a total of 574 women with a confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis, 359 (62.5%) applied some form of CHA/HR. Women suffering from fatiguing disease symptoms more often selected alternative therapies (odds ratio [OR] 3.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-7.11, P = 0.006) compared with women without these characteristics. Furthermore, women dissatisfied with healthcare provided by their treating physician, more frequently (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.19-4.45, P = 0.013) chose the aforementioned alternative strategies.

CONCLUSION
As conventional therapies may not be sufficiently effective, women's needs should be closely examined, and individual treatment options should be discussed and initiated by clinicians to provide the best comprehensive treatment possible for endometriosis.

Abstract

RESEARCH QUESTION
Conventional treatments are often associated with adverse effects and endometriosis pain symptoms may reoccur despite treatment. Consequently, many women use complementary health approaches (CHA) and home remedies (HR) to relieve their pain. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency and the subjectively perceived efficacy of CHA/HR use by women affected by endometriosis.

DESIGN
Retrospective evaluation using medical charts and a questionnaire. Women recruited in hospitals and in self-help groups were asked about the use of 'topical heat', 'repose/relaxation', 'movement/massages', 'homeopathy/phytotherapy', 'acupuncture/traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)' and 'kinesiology/physiotherapy'.

RESULTS
From a total of 574 women with a confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis, 359 (62.5%) applied some form of CHA/HR. Women suffering from fatiguing disease symptoms more often selected alternative therapies (odds ratio [OR] 3.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-7.11, P = 0.006) compared with women without these characteristics. Furthermore, women dissatisfied with healthcare provided by their treating physician, more frequently (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.19-4.45, P = 0.013) chose the aforementioned alternative strategies.

CONCLUSION
As conventional therapies may not be sufficiently effective, women's needs should be closely examined, and individual treatment options should be discussed and initiated by clinicians to provide the best comprehensive treatment possible for endometriosis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gynecology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reproductive Endocrinology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Reproductive Medicine
Health Sciences > Obstetrics and Gynecology
Life Sciences > Developmental Biology
Language:English
Date:1 February 2019
Deposited On:05 Feb 2019 14:13
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 09:11
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1472-6483
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rbmo.2018.10.009
PubMed ID:30612955

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