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Interference of action perception on action production increases across the adult life span


Wermelinger, Stephanie; Gampe, Anja; Behr, Jannis; Daum, Moritz M (2018). Interference of action perception on action production increases across the adult life span. Experimental Brain Research, 236(2):577-586.

Abstract

Action perception and action production are assumed to be based on an internal simulation process that involves the sensorimotor system. This system undergoes changes across the life span and is assumed to become less precise with age. In the current study, we investigated how increasing age affects the magnitude of interference in action production during simultaneous action perception. In a task adapted from Brass et al. (Brain Cogn 44(2):124-143, 2000), we asked participants (aged 20-80 years) to respond to a visually presented finger movement and/or symbolic cue by executing a previously defined finger movement. Action production was assessed via participants' reaction times. Results show that participants were slower in trials in which they were asked to ignore an incongruent finger movement compared to trials in which they had to ignore an incongruent symbolic cue. Moreover, advancing age was shown to accentuate this effect. We suggest that the internal simulation of the action becomes less precise with age making the sensorimotor system more susceptible to perturbations such as the interference of a concurrent action perception.

Abstract

Action perception and action production are assumed to be based on an internal simulation process that involves the sensorimotor system. This system undergoes changes across the life span and is assumed to become less precise with age. In the current study, we investigated how increasing age affects the magnitude of interference in action production during simultaneous action perception. In a task adapted from Brass et al. (Brain Cogn 44(2):124-143, 2000), we asked participants (aged 20-80 years) to respond to a visually presented finger movement and/or symbolic cue by executing a previously defined finger movement. Action production was assessed via participants' reaction times. Results show that participants were slower in trials in which they were asked to ignore an incongruent finger movement compared to trials in which they had to ignore an incongruent symbolic cue. Moreover, advancing age was shown to accentuate this effect. We suggest that the internal simulation of the action becomes less precise with age making the sensorimotor system more susceptible to perturbations such as the interference of a concurrent action perception.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych Erstautor
Language:English
Date:February 2018
Deposited On:16 Jan 2019 14:49
Last Modified:28 Jun 2019 07:16
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0014-4819
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-017-5157-3
Official URL:https://osf.io/yw38a/
PubMed ID:29249051
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDS-63216-03-01
  • : Project Title

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