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Impact of the epoxide hydrolase EphD on the metabolism of mycolic acids in mycobacteria


Madacki, Jan; Laval, Françoise; Grzegorzewicz, Anna; Lemassu, Anne; Záhorszká, Monika; Arand, Michael; McNeil, Michael; Daffé, Mamadou; Jackson, Mary; Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Korduláková, Jana (2018). Impact of the epoxide hydrolase EphD on the metabolism of mycolic acids in mycobacteria. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 293(14):5172-5184.

Abstract

Mycolic acids are the hallmark of the cell envelope in mycobacteria, which include the important human pathogens and Mycolic acids are very long C60-C90 α-alkyl β-hydroxy fatty acids having a variety of functional groups on their hydrocarbon chain that define several mycolate types. Mycobacteria also produce an unusually large number of putative epoxide hydrolases, but the physiological functions of these enzymes are still unclear. Here, we report that the mycobacterial epoxide hydrolase EphD is involved in mycolic acid metabolism. We found that orthologs of EphD from and are functional epoxide hydrolases, cleaving a lipophilic substrate, 9,10--epoxystearic acid, and forming a vicinal diol. The results of EphD overproduction in and BCG Δ strains producing epoxymycolic acids indicated that EphD is involved in the metabolism of these forms of mycolates in both fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria. Moreover, using MALDI-TOF-MS and H NMR spectroscopy of mycolic acids and lipids isolated from EphD-overproducing , we identified new oxygenated mycolic acid species that accumulated during epoxymycolate depletion. Disruption of the gene in specifically impaired the synthesis of ketomycolates and caused accumulation of their precursor, hydroxymycolate, indicating either direct or indirect involvement of EphD in ketomycolate biosynthesis. Our results clearly indicate that EphD plays a role in metabolism of oxygenated mycolic acids in mycobacteria.

Abstract

Mycolic acids are the hallmark of the cell envelope in mycobacteria, which include the important human pathogens and Mycolic acids are very long C60-C90 α-alkyl β-hydroxy fatty acids having a variety of functional groups on their hydrocarbon chain that define several mycolate types. Mycobacteria also produce an unusually large number of putative epoxide hydrolases, but the physiological functions of these enzymes are still unclear. Here, we report that the mycobacterial epoxide hydrolase EphD is involved in mycolic acid metabolism. We found that orthologs of EphD from and are functional epoxide hydrolases, cleaving a lipophilic substrate, 9,10--epoxystearic acid, and forming a vicinal diol. The results of EphD overproduction in and BCG Δ strains producing epoxymycolic acids indicated that EphD is involved in the metabolism of these forms of mycolates in both fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria. Moreover, using MALDI-TOF-MS and H NMR spectroscopy of mycolic acids and lipids isolated from EphD-overproducing , we identified new oxygenated mycolic acid species that accumulated during epoxymycolate depletion. Disruption of the gene in specifically impaired the synthesis of ketomycolates and caused accumulation of their precursor, hydroxymycolate, indicating either direct or indirect involvement of EphD in ketomycolate biosynthesis. Our results clearly indicate that EphD plays a role in metabolism of oxygenated mycolic acids in mycobacteria.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:6 April 2018
Deposited On:20 Feb 2019 15:41
Last Modified:06 Apr 2019 00:00
Publisher:American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
ISSN:0021-9258
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.RA117.000246
PubMed ID:29472294

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