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Clinical impact of optical coherence tomography findings on culprit plaque in acute coronary syndrome: The OCT-FORMIDABLE study registry


Iannaccone, Mario; Souteyrand, Geraud; Niccoli, Giampaolo; Mancone, Massimo; Sardella, Gennaro; Tamburino, Corrado; Templin, Christian; Gili, Sebastiano; Boccuzzi, Giacomo G; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio (2018). Clinical impact of optical coherence tomography findings on culprit plaque in acute coronary syndrome: The OCT-FORMIDABLE study registry. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, 92(7):E486-E492.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of the culprit plaque features assessed by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS).
METHODS The OCT-FORMIDABLE register enrolled retrospectively all consecutive patients who perform OCT on culprit plaque in patients with ACS in nine European centres. The primary endpoint was the prevalence of culprit plaque rupture (CPR) in patients experiencing major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs). Secondary endpoint was the prevalence necrotic core with macrophage infiltrations (NCMI) in the patients experiencing MACEs.
RESULTS Two-hundred and nine patients were included in the study. Mean age was 60.1 ± 12.9 years old, 19.1% were females. Main clinical presentation was ST-elevation myocardial infarction (55%). At OCT analysis, CPR was observed in 71.8% patients, while 31.6% presented NCMI. During follow-up (12.6 ± 14.5 months), 11% of the patients experienced MACEs. The presence of CPR (HR 3.7,1.4-9.8, P < .01) and NCMI (HR 3.3,1.6-6.6, P < .01) were independent predictors for MACEs, while dual antiplatelet therapy with prasugrel/ticagrelor at discharge (HR 0.2,0.1-0.6, P < .01) were protective. The protective impact of new antiplatelet drugs was reported only in patients with CPR while in patients without any of the baseline clinical or procedural features impacted on MACEs.
CONCLUSIONS CPR and the presence of NCMI are independent predictors of worse outcome. Patients with CPR seem to benefit more of an intensive therapy, both from a pharmacological and interventional point of view. (NCT02486861).

Abstract

BACKGROUND Aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of the culprit plaque features assessed by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS).
METHODS The OCT-FORMIDABLE register enrolled retrospectively all consecutive patients who perform OCT on culprit plaque in patients with ACS in nine European centres. The primary endpoint was the prevalence of culprit plaque rupture (CPR) in patients experiencing major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs). Secondary endpoint was the prevalence necrotic core with macrophage infiltrations (NCMI) in the patients experiencing MACEs.
RESULTS Two-hundred and nine patients were included in the study. Mean age was 60.1 ± 12.9 years old, 19.1% were females. Main clinical presentation was ST-elevation myocardial infarction (55%). At OCT analysis, CPR was observed in 71.8% patients, while 31.6% presented NCMI. During follow-up (12.6 ± 14.5 months), 11% of the patients experienced MACEs. The presence of CPR (HR 3.7,1.4-9.8, P < .01) and NCMI (HR 3.3,1.6-6.6, P < .01) were independent predictors for MACEs, while dual antiplatelet therapy with prasugrel/ticagrelor at discharge (HR 0.2,0.1-0.6, P < .01) were protective. The protective impact of new antiplatelet drugs was reported only in patients with CPR while in patients without any of the baseline clinical or procedural features impacted on MACEs.
CONCLUSIONS CPR and the presence of NCMI are independent predictors of worse outcome. Patients with CPR seem to benefit more of an intensive therapy, both from a pharmacological and interventional point of view. (NCT02486861).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 December 2018
Deposited On:20 Feb 2019 17:48
Last Modified:20 Feb 2019 18:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1522-1946
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ccd.27633
PubMed ID:29745476

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