Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The Power of Attention: Using Eye Gaze to Predict Other-Regarding and Moral Choices


Ghaffari-Tabrizi, Minou; Fiedler, Susann (2018). The Power of Attention: Using Eye Gaze to Predict Other-Regarding and Moral Choices. Psychological Science, 29(11):1878-1889.

Abstract

According to research studying the processes underlying decisions, a two-channel mechanism connects attention and choices: top-down and bottom-up processes. To identify the magnitude of each channel, we exogenously varied information intake by systematically interrupting participants' decision processes in Study 1 ( N = 116). Results showed that participants were more likely to choose a predetermined target option. Because selection effects limited the interpretation of the results, we used a sequential-presentation paradigm in Study 2 (preregistered, N = 100). To partial out bottom-up effects of attention on choices, in particular, we presented alternatives by mirroring the gaze patterns of autonomous decision makers. Results revealed that final fixations successfully predicted choices when experimentally manipulated (bottom up). Specifically, up to 11.32% of the link between attention and choices is driven by exogenously guided attention (1.19% change in choices overall), while the remaining variance is explained by top-down preference formation.

Abstract

According to research studying the processes underlying decisions, a two-channel mechanism connects attention and choices: top-down and bottom-up processes. To identify the magnitude of each channel, we exogenously varied information intake by systematically interrupting participants' decision processes in Study 1 ( N = 116). Results showed that participants were more likely to choose a predetermined target option. Because selection effects limited the interpretation of the results, we used a sequential-presentation paradigm in Study 2 (preregistered, N = 100). To partial out bottom-up effects of attention on choices, in particular, we presented alternatives by mirroring the gaze patterns of autonomous decision makers. Results revealed that final fixations successfully predicted choices when experimentally manipulated (bottom up). Specifically, up to 11.32% of the link between attention and choices is driven by exogenously guided attention (1.19% change in choices overall), while the remaining variance is explained by top-down preference formation.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
5 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:doktoratpsych erstautor
Language:English
Date:November 2018
Deposited On:23 Jan 2019 14:10
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:09
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:0956-7976
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797618799301
PubMed ID:30295569

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library