Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Body representation and motor imagery : effects of adaptability


Jola, Corinne; Hepp - Reymond, Marie-Claude. Body representation and motor imagery : effects of adaptability. 2009, University of Zurich, Faculty of Arts.

Abstract

We are occupants of a body that receives diverse sensory input via our visual and somatosensory system. Furthermore, as we are the agent of our own body, the brain must also deal with both the afferent and efferent signals that occur with movement, namely the motor system. How do we perceive our stationary or moving body as well as the world around us as a coherent whole? Mental representations are assumed to support and modify our perception, as well as the resulting behaviour, the action. In this thesis, representational processes in the perception of the body and its movements are discussed in relation to the particular systems: vision, somatosensory, and motor. In chapter 1, the general introduction, the terms „representation‟ and „images‟, as well as „body representation‟ and „movement representation‟ are described along the lines of previous research and defined for their appropriate use within this thesis. Specific background literature and concepts with respect to the experiments are discussed in the introductory sections within each individual chapter. Chapters 2 and 3 explore representations of the stationary body by the sensory modalities vision, proprioception, and touch, whilst chapter 4 deals with mental representation in movement. Overall, the results of these investigations exemplify the adaptability of representational processes based on different sensory systems in the stationary and the moving body (see chapter 5). The three experiments combined in chapter 2 investigated body representations based on the visual sensory system. The question was, to what extent does the form of what we visually perceive influence our mental transformation processes? All three experiments gave evidence that different 3 forms of body representations in response to vision are behaviourally not as disparate as suggested by previous investigations. For example, participants needed more time to mentally transform visually presented stimuli with increasing angular disparity between them. This was the case for abstract objects as well as for bodies when no rotation in depth was necessary (Experiment 1). The response pattern for identifying the outstretched arm in a body figure was thus comparable to that when identifying abstract objects. Hence without depth rotation, egocentric body transformation is akin to mental object rotation. In contrast to the hypothesis on effects of expertise, however, no effect could be observed between subjects: The reaction times between dancers, who are experienced in mentally transforming bodies, and novices did not differ significantly (Experiment 2). Surprisingly, when body postures were presented in the abstract dance notation of Laban (Experiment 3), no mental rotation costs were measured. These three experiments showed that mental transformations were available in different prospects, of which one is perspective-independent. Consequently, in certain conditions the mental presentations seem to switch quickly from a perspective dependent to an independent form. Accordingly, mental representations are not singularly dependent on the presentation form. Cognitive processing of either visually perceived abstract objects, body drawings, or body-related symbols were comparable, whereas the spatial frame of reference, the orientation between the observer and the perceived orientation of the stimuli, was of primary relevance. The type of visual presentation only defines the form of mental representation used for the transformation when a mental rotation in depth is needed. 4 The experiments in chapter 3 looked at how we sense the body in egocentric space based on somatosensory perception. In particular, the first of these psychophysical investigations was concerned with the perception of body limbs in space, that is, proprioceptive sensory mode (Experiment 4). The second was an experiment on tactile perception on the body surface, that is, tactile sensory mode (Experiment 5). Proprioception is the sense which is thought to give us the experience of our own body posture. The tactile sensory mode consists of two distinct perceptual processes: the tactile experience itself (tactile recognition) and the localisation on our body surface (tactile localisation). Both proprioception and tactile localisation revealed effects of adaptability on body reference points. The experiment on proprioception showed that actively pointing to a location in egocentric space is biased by two reference centres of the body located at each shoulder in all but the visual condition. Dancers showed a smaller bias of the two reference centres; but interestingly, they also showed it in the visual task. Therefore, the perception of the self in egocentric space referred to different functional body references according to both the sensory modality used and the individual‟s motor expertise. Moreover, the modality can be substituted with simulation, such as simulated proprioception in the dancers‟ group. The experiment on tactile localisation showed that the point of sensations of touch was located closer to the body centre than the original stimulation. This was the case in both sensory modes that were available to localise a point of touch: vision (by visual estimation) and motor (by pointing). Thus, the body centre acts as a reference point independent of the response mode. Interestingly, additional tactile information from the tip of the finger caused a switch in the direction of the mislocalisation from the body centre to the periphery. Consequently, 5 representations of the egocentric space are adaptable in both the short- and long-term, and this adaptability is dependent on both sensory input and expertise, respectively. Further, tactile perception is immediately integrated in the perception of the body space and has a dramatic effect on spatial localisation on the body surface. Chapter 4 discusses how movement representations can evolve by motor imagery training compared to common execution training. Mentally rehearsing the abduction of the big toe, a movement without established motor command, caused a reduction in the time taken to move whereas exertion force was most increased by execution training (Experiment 6). This finding shows conceptually different training effects between imagery and execution. It goes beyond previous behavioural studies that have shown differences between imagery training and execution training in the level of performance increase alone. In addition, a representation of the movement goal (anticipation) surprisingly improved participants‟ movement abilities, as could be observed by a performance increase in the movement range of the abduction. Thus along with representations of the stationary body, mental representations can be consciously instrumentalised in the moving body, such as motor imagery or anticipation; they can also show short- and long-term performance adaptations, respectively. Chapter 5 is a general discussion of the experimental results. The data from this thesis supports the existence of a nonmodular adaptable body representation that can accommodate long-term changes (through experience) as well as rapid switches (from different sensory feedback information). Representations are hypothesised to be the effect of adaptability processes. In addition, the importance of differential observation is highlighted.
Der Körper ist unser Instrument, mit dem wir uns in der Welt zurechtfinden. Űber die verschiedenen Sinnessysteme des Körpers können wir unsere Umwelt sowie die ‚Körperinnenwelt‟ erfahren. Das visuelle System ermöglicht ein Abbild der Aussenwelt. Das somatosensorische System, bestehend aus der Propriozeption und der Berührungsempfindung ist wichtig, um die Position unseres Körpers im Raum sowie die Gestalt unseres Körpers wahrzunehmen. Nebst diesen im passiven Körper vorhandenen Sinneseindrücken haben wir aber auch Bewegungsempfindung: Wir sind nicht nur Empfänger von Sinneseindrücken, wir agieren aktiv mit unserem Körper in der Umwelt. Im Gehirn findet ein Zusammenspiel sowohl von solchen afferenten als auch efferenten Signalen statt. Wie aber ist es möglich, dass wir trotz der Information von verschiedenen Sinnessystemen unseren passiv oder aktiv (bewegten) Körper sowie die Welt um uns herum als eine zusammenhängende kohärente Entität wahrnehmen? Mentale Repräsentationen sind ein zentrales Element in diesem Integrationsprozess: Sie spielen eine wichtige Rolle in dem Zusammenspiel von Wahrnehmung und resultierendem Verhalten (die Handlung). In dieser Arbeit werden mentale Repräsentationen der Wahrnehmung des Körpers und seiner Bewegungen in Bezug auf die besonderen Sinnessysteme besprochen: visuelle, somatosensorische und motorische Sinneswahrnehmung. Das erste Kapitel gibt eine Einführung in die Begriffe Repräsentation und mentale Bilder, sowie Körperrepräsentation und Bewegungsrepräsentationen. Insbesondere wird der spezifische Gebrauch der Begriffe innerhalb dieser Arbeit 7 definiert. Weitergehende Einführungen sind in den Einleitungen der jeweiligen experimentellen Kapitel zwei bis vier zu finden. Die mentale Körpertransformation basierend auf dem visuellen System wird in Kapitel zwei besprochen. In Experiment 1 wurden die Prozesse in der mentalen Rotation von Objekten und Körpern untersucht. Dabeit hat sich gezeigt, dass insbesondere die Rotation in der Tiefe das Verhalten der Versuchspersonen beeinflusst. Versuchspersonen benötigen für die Diskriminierung zweier abstrakter Objekte in der Regel länger, je grösser die Diskrepanz in der Ausrichtung der zu beurteilenden Objekte ist. Dieser Rotationseffekt konnte auch bei der Identifizierung von Körperstimuli nachgewiesen werden, jedoch nur wenn die Ausrichtung der Stimuli mit der egozentrischen Perspektive der Versuchsperson übereinstimmte, das heisst, wenn keine Rotation in der Tiefe notwendig war. In Experiment 2 wurde der Einfluss der generellen Bewegungsexpertise von Tänzern auf die mentale Transformation von Körpern untersucht. Die Daten der beiden bis auf die Probandengruppe identischen Experimente 1 und 2 zeigten keinen Unterschied zwischen Tänzern und nicht- Tänzern in Bezug auf die mentale Körperrotation. In Experiment 3 wurde schliesslich untersucht, welchen Einfluss die Form des visuell präsentierten Körpers auf die mentale Repräsentation und Transformation hat. Dazu wurde in der Hälfte der Bedingungen der Körper in der Labanotation, einer etablierten Tanzschrift dargestellt. In der Labanotation werden arbiträre Symbole für die Darstellung der verschiedenen Körperglieder verwendet. In der Diskriminierung zweier Körperpositionen in unterschiedlicher Orientierung haben sich erhöhte Reaktionszeiten nur bei Stimuli in Form von Fotos einer Tänzerin, nicht aber in Form von abstrakter Labanotation gezeigt. Das heisst, die mentale 8 Repräsentation von Körpern und/oder deren Prozesse sind perspektiven- unabhängig, wenn die Repräsentation von arbiträren visuellen Körperstimuli generiert wurden. Die drei Experimente im ersten Kapitel zeigten, dass die Repräsentation von Körpern und Objekten sowie deren mentalen Transformation von der Form der visuellen Stimuli und insbesondere auch von deren Orientierung abhängig ist. Die Prozesse der Repräsentationen zeigten sich teilweise bei identischer primärer visueller Darstellung unabhängig und teilweise abhängig von Perspektivenwechsel. Dieser Effekt lässt eine hohe Adaptabilität der Repräsentation von Körpern basierend auf visueller Wahrnehmung vermuten. In Kapitel drei wird die Verarbeitung und Wahrnehmung des Körpers im egozentrischen Raum basierend auf somatosensorischer Empfindung untersucht und dargestellt. Im vorhergehenden Kapitel hat sich gezeigt, dass die Perspektivenabhängigkeit, und somit der egozentrische Referenzpunkt der Körperrepräsentation von den visuellen Stimuli beeinflusst ist. Die Experimente 4 und 5 untersuchten die Referenzpunkte innerhalb der Wahrnehmung des eigenen Körpers in der motorischen Interaktion im egozentrischen Raum. Mittels Experiment 4 konnte gezeigt werden, dass die beiden Schultern als Referenzpunkte wirken, wenn Probanden Punkte im Raum lokalisieren mussten. Die Bewegungserfahrung von Tänzern jedoch führte erstens zu geringeren Schätzungsfehlern basierend auf einem Referenzpunkt im Körperzentrum. Zweitens zeigten Tänzer dieselben Abweichungen in der Lokalisierung bei visuellem wie bei propriozeptivem Feedback. Möglicherweise haben die Tänzer in der visuellen Bedingung ein ‚virtuelles‟ propriozeptives Feedback generiert. In Experiment 5 mussten die Probanden taktile Berührungspunkte auf dem Arm lokalisieren. Die Punkte wurden konsistent zu nah am Körper geschätzt. Wenn 9 die Probanden jedoch zusätzlich taktile Stimulation am Finger erhielten, kehrte sich die Unterschätzung der Distanz vom Körperzentrum zum Berührungspunkt in eine Überschätzung um. Eine kurzfristige Integration zusätzlicher Berührungspunkte wurde vermuted. Beide Experimente zeigten unterschiedliche anpassungsfähige Körperreferenzpunkte, kurzfristig in bezug auf die vorhandene sensorische Information sowie langfristig basierend auf Erfahrung. Schliesslich wird in Kapitel vier der Einfluss der motorischen Vorstellung auf die Bewegungsrepräsentation untersucht. Es hat sich gezeigt, dass mentales Training und physisches Bewegungstraining sich nicht nur in der Intensität unterscheiden, sondern vermutlich zwei verschiedene Prozesse sind. Mentales Training führte zu einer rascheren Ausführung der erlernten Bewegung während Bewegungstraining die Kraft erhöhte. Die Bewegungsrepräsentation ist daher unterschiedlich adaptiv, abhängig davon, wie sie angesprochen wird. Die Befunde der Experimente 1 bis 6 werden in Kapitel fünf diskutiert. Mentale Repräsentationen zeigten sich in dieser Arbeit über verschiedene Sinnessysteme hinweg anpassungsfähig. Die Resultate lassen vermuten, dass die effiziente Interaktion mit der Umwelt durch einen adaptiven Mechanismus mentaler Repräsentationen ermöglicht wird. Repräsentationen in dem Sinne können als Effekte der Adaptabilität verstanden werden. Unter dieser Annahme wird das aktuelle Forschungsvorgehen diskutiert. Jeder Körper, jeder Geist sowie deren assoziierten Repräsentationen haben sich adaptiv an die Umwelt angepasst und tun dies kontinuierlich in einem individuellen Sinne. Um adaptive Prozesse in der Kognition zu entdecken, scheint es entgegen dem gebräuchlichen methodischen Vorgehen angebracht, das Augenmerk auf individuelle Ausprägungen zu richten.




10

Abstract

We are occupants of a body that receives diverse sensory input via our visual and somatosensory system. Furthermore, as we are the agent of our own body, the brain must also deal with both the afferent and efferent signals that occur with movement, namely the motor system. How do we perceive our stationary or moving body as well as the world around us as a coherent whole? Mental representations are assumed to support and modify our perception, as well as the resulting behaviour, the action. In this thesis, representational processes in the perception of the body and its movements are discussed in relation to the particular systems: vision, somatosensory, and motor. In chapter 1, the general introduction, the terms „representation‟ and „images‟, as well as „body representation‟ and „movement representation‟ are described along the lines of previous research and defined for their appropriate use within this thesis. Specific background literature and concepts with respect to the experiments are discussed in the introductory sections within each individual chapter. Chapters 2 and 3 explore representations of the stationary body by the sensory modalities vision, proprioception, and touch, whilst chapter 4 deals with mental representation in movement. Overall, the results of these investigations exemplify the adaptability of representational processes based on different sensory systems in the stationary and the moving body (see chapter 5). The three experiments combined in chapter 2 investigated body representations based on the visual sensory system. The question was, to what extent does the form of what we visually perceive influence our mental transformation processes? All three experiments gave evidence that different 3 forms of body representations in response to vision are behaviourally not as disparate as suggested by previous investigations. For example, participants needed more time to mentally transform visually presented stimuli with increasing angular disparity between them. This was the case for abstract objects as well as for bodies when no rotation in depth was necessary (Experiment 1). The response pattern for identifying the outstretched arm in a body figure was thus comparable to that when identifying abstract objects. Hence without depth rotation, egocentric body transformation is akin to mental object rotation. In contrast to the hypothesis on effects of expertise, however, no effect could be observed between subjects: The reaction times between dancers, who are experienced in mentally transforming bodies, and novices did not differ significantly (Experiment 2). Surprisingly, when body postures were presented in the abstract dance notation of Laban (Experiment 3), no mental rotation costs were measured. These three experiments showed that mental transformations were available in different prospects, of which one is perspective-independent. Consequently, in certain conditions the mental presentations seem to switch quickly from a perspective dependent to an independent form. Accordingly, mental representations are not singularly dependent on the presentation form. Cognitive processing of either visually perceived abstract objects, body drawings, or body-related symbols were comparable, whereas the spatial frame of reference, the orientation between the observer and the perceived orientation of the stimuli, was of primary relevance. The type of visual presentation only defines the form of mental representation used for the transformation when a mental rotation in depth is needed. 4 The experiments in chapter 3 looked at how we sense the body in egocentric space based on somatosensory perception. In particular, the first of these psychophysical investigations was concerned with the perception of body limbs in space, that is, proprioceptive sensory mode (Experiment 4). The second was an experiment on tactile perception on the body surface, that is, tactile sensory mode (Experiment 5). Proprioception is the sense which is thought to give us the experience of our own body posture. The tactile sensory mode consists of two distinct perceptual processes: the tactile experience itself (tactile recognition) and the localisation on our body surface (tactile localisation). Both proprioception and tactile localisation revealed effects of adaptability on body reference points. The experiment on proprioception showed that actively pointing to a location in egocentric space is biased by two reference centres of the body located at each shoulder in all but the visual condition. Dancers showed a smaller bias of the two reference centres; but interestingly, they also showed it in the visual task. Therefore, the perception of the self in egocentric space referred to different functional body references according to both the sensory modality used and the individual‟s motor expertise. Moreover, the modality can be substituted with simulation, such as simulated proprioception in the dancers‟ group. The experiment on tactile localisation showed that the point of sensations of touch was located closer to the body centre than the original stimulation. This was the case in both sensory modes that were available to localise a point of touch: vision (by visual estimation) and motor (by pointing). Thus, the body centre acts as a reference point independent of the response mode. Interestingly, additional tactile information from the tip of the finger caused a switch in the direction of the mislocalisation from the body centre to the periphery. Consequently, 5 representations of the egocentric space are adaptable in both the short- and long-term, and this adaptability is dependent on both sensory input and expertise, respectively. Further, tactile perception is immediately integrated in the perception of the body space and has a dramatic effect on spatial localisation on the body surface. Chapter 4 discusses how movement representations can evolve by motor imagery training compared to common execution training. Mentally rehearsing the abduction of the big toe, a movement without established motor command, caused a reduction in the time taken to move whereas exertion force was most increased by execution training (Experiment 6). This finding shows conceptually different training effects between imagery and execution. It goes beyond previous behavioural studies that have shown differences between imagery training and execution training in the level of performance increase alone. In addition, a representation of the movement goal (anticipation) surprisingly improved participants‟ movement abilities, as could be observed by a performance increase in the movement range of the abduction. Thus along with representations of the stationary body, mental representations can be consciously instrumentalised in the moving body, such as motor imagery or anticipation; they can also show short- and long-term performance adaptations, respectively. Chapter 5 is a general discussion of the experimental results. The data from this thesis supports the existence of a nonmodular adaptable body representation that can accommodate long-term changes (through experience) as well as rapid switches (from different sensory feedback information). Representations are hypothesised to be the effect of adaptability processes. In addition, the importance of differential observation is highlighted.
Der Körper ist unser Instrument, mit dem wir uns in der Welt zurechtfinden. Űber die verschiedenen Sinnessysteme des Körpers können wir unsere Umwelt sowie die ‚Körperinnenwelt‟ erfahren. Das visuelle System ermöglicht ein Abbild der Aussenwelt. Das somatosensorische System, bestehend aus der Propriozeption und der Berührungsempfindung ist wichtig, um die Position unseres Körpers im Raum sowie die Gestalt unseres Körpers wahrzunehmen. Nebst diesen im passiven Körper vorhandenen Sinneseindrücken haben wir aber auch Bewegungsempfindung: Wir sind nicht nur Empfänger von Sinneseindrücken, wir agieren aktiv mit unserem Körper in der Umwelt. Im Gehirn findet ein Zusammenspiel sowohl von solchen afferenten als auch efferenten Signalen statt. Wie aber ist es möglich, dass wir trotz der Information von verschiedenen Sinnessystemen unseren passiv oder aktiv (bewegten) Körper sowie die Welt um uns herum als eine zusammenhängende kohärente Entität wahrnehmen? Mentale Repräsentationen sind ein zentrales Element in diesem Integrationsprozess: Sie spielen eine wichtige Rolle in dem Zusammenspiel von Wahrnehmung und resultierendem Verhalten (die Handlung). In dieser Arbeit werden mentale Repräsentationen der Wahrnehmung des Körpers und seiner Bewegungen in Bezug auf die besonderen Sinnessysteme besprochen: visuelle, somatosensorische und motorische Sinneswahrnehmung. Das erste Kapitel gibt eine Einführung in die Begriffe Repräsentation und mentale Bilder, sowie Körperrepräsentation und Bewegungsrepräsentationen. Insbesondere wird der spezifische Gebrauch der Begriffe innerhalb dieser Arbeit 7 definiert. Weitergehende Einführungen sind in den Einleitungen der jeweiligen experimentellen Kapitel zwei bis vier zu finden. Die mentale Körpertransformation basierend auf dem visuellen System wird in Kapitel zwei besprochen. In Experiment 1 wurden die Prozesse in der mentalen Rotation von Objekten und Körpern untersucht. Dabeit hat sich gezeigt, dass insbesondere die Rotation in der Tiefe das Verhalten der Versuchspersonen beeinflusst. Versuchspersonen benötigen für die Diskriminierung zweier abstrakter Objekte in der Regel länger, je grösser die Diskrepanz in der Ausrichtung der zu beurteilenden Objekte ist. Dieser Rotationseffekt konnte auch bei der Identifizierung von Körperstimuli nachgewiesen werden, jedoch nur wenn die Ausrichtung der Stimuli mit der egozentrischen Perspektive der Versuchsperson übereinstimmte, das heisst, wenn keine Rotation in der Tiefe notwendig war. In Experiment 2 wurde der Einfluss der generellen Bewegungsexpertise von Tänzern auf die mentale Transformation von Körpern untersucht. Die Daten der beiden bis auf die Probandengruppe identischen Experimente 1 und 2 zeigten keinen Unterschied zwischen Tänzern und nicht- Tänzern in Bezug auf die mentale Körperrotation. In Experiment 3 wurde schliesslich untersucht, welchen Einfluss die Form des visuell präsentierten Körpers auf die mentale Repräsentation und Transformation hat. Dazu wurde in der Hälfte der Bedingungen der Körper in der Labanotation, einer etablierten Tanzschrift dargestellt. In der Labanotation werden arbiträre Symbole für die Darstellung der verschiedenen Körperglieder verwendet. In der Diskriminierung zweier Körperpositionen in unterschiedlicher Orientierung haben sich erhöhte Reaktionszeiten nur bei Stimuli in Form von Fotos einer Tänzerin, nicht aber in Form von abstrakter Labanotation gezeigt. Das heisst, die mentale 8 Repräsentation von Körpern und/oder deren Prozesse sind perspektiven- unabhängig, wenn die Repräsentation von arbiträren visuellen Körperstimuli generiert wurden. Die drei Experimente im ersten Kapitel zeigten, dass die Repräsentation von Körpern und Objekten sowie deren mentalen Transformation von der Form der visuellen Stimuli und insbesondere auch von deren Orientierung abhängig ist. Die Prozesse der Repräsentationen zeigten sich teilweise bei identischer primärer visueller Darstellung unabhängig und teilweise abhängig von Perspektivenwechsel. Dieser Effekt lässt eine hohe Adaptabilität der Repräsentation von Körpern basierend auf visueller Wahrnehmung vermuten. In Kapitel drei wird die Verarbeitung und Wahrnehmung des Körpers im egozentrischen Raum basierend auf somatosensorischer Empfindung untersucht und dargestellt. Im vorhergehenden Kapitel hat sich gezeigt, dass die Perspektivenabhängigkeit, und somit der egozentrische Referenzpunkt der Körperrepräsentation von den visuellen Stimuli beeinflusst ist. Die Experimente 4 und 5 untersuchten die Referenzpunkte innerhalb der Wahrnehmung des eigenen Körpers in der motorischen Interaktion im egozentrischen Raum. Mittels Experiment 4 konnte gezeigt werden, dass die beiden Schultern als Referenzpunkte wirken, wenn Probanden Punkte im Raum lokalisieren mussten. Die Bewegungserfahrung von Tänzern jedoch führte erstens zu geringeren Schätzungsfehlern basierend auf einem Referenzpunkt im Körperzentrum. Zweitens zeigten Tänzer dieselben Abweichungen in der Lokalisierung bei visuellem wie bei propriozeptivem Feedback. Möglicherweise haben die Tänzer in der visuellen Bedingung ein ‚virtuelles‟ propriozeptives Feedback generiert. In Experiment 5 mussten die Probanden taktile Berührungspunkte auf dem Arm lokalisieren. Die Punkte wurden konsistent zu nah am Körper geschätzt. Wenn 9 die Probanden jedoch zusätzlich taktile Stimulation am Finger erhielten, kehrte sich die Unterschätzung der Distanz vom Körperzentrum zum Berührungspunkt in eine Überschätzung um. Eine kurzfristige Integration zusätzlicher Berührungspunkte wurde vermuted. Beide Experimente zeigten unterschiedliche anpassungsfähige Körperreferenzpunkte, kurzfristig in bezug auf die vorhandene sensorische Information sowie langfristig basierend auf Erfahrung. Schliesslich wird in Kapitel vier der Einfluss der motorischen Vorstellung auf die Bewegungsrepräsentation untersucht. Es hat sich gezeigt, dass mentales Training und physisches Bewegungstraining sich nicht nur in der Intensität unterscheiden, sondern vermutlich zwei verschiedene Prozesse sind. Mentales Training führte zu einer rascheren Ausführung der erlernten Bewegung während Bewegungstraining die Kraft erhöhte. Die Bewegungsrepräsentation ist daher unterschiedlich adaptiv, abhängig davon, wie sie angesprochen wird. Die Befunde der Experimente 1 bis 6 werden in Kapitel fünf diskutiert. Mentale Repräsentationen zeigten sich in dieser Arbeit über verschiedene Sinnessysteme hinweg anpassungsfähig. Die Resultate lassen vermuten, dass die effiziente Interaktion mit der Umwelt durch einen adaptiven Mechanismus mentaler Repräsentationen ermöglicht wird. Repräsentationen in dem Sinne können als Effekte der Adaptabilität verstanden werden. Unter dieser Annahme wird das aktuelle Forschungsvorgehen diskutiert. Jeder Körper, jeder Geist sowie deren assoziierten Repräsentationen haben sich adaptiv an die Umwelt angepasst und tun dies kontinuierlich in einem individuellen Sinne. Um adaptive Prozesse in der Kognition zu entdecken, scheint es entgegen dem gebräuchlichen methodischen Vorgehen angebracht, das Augenmerk auf individuelle Ausprägungen zu richten.




10

Statistics

Downloads

36 downloads since deposited on 15 May 2019
22 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation (monographical)
Referees:Mast Fred W
Communities & Collections:UZH Dissertations
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:English
Place of Publication:Zürich
Date:2009
Deposited On:15 May 2019 07:44
Last Modified:15 Apr 2021 15:00
Number of Pages:189
OA Status:Green

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Body representation and motor imagery : effects of adaptability'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB