Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The effects of interferon gamma deficiency on the autoimmune inflammation of the central nervous system


Tosevski, Vinko. The effects of interferon gamma deficiency on the autoimmune inflammation of the central nervous system. 2014, University of Zurich, Faculty of Science.

Abstract

Experimental  autoimmune  encephalomyelitis  (EAE)  is  a  robust  and  valuable  animal  model  of  autoimmune  inflammation  of  the  central  nervous  system  (CNS).  Clinically,  in  most  rodents,  it  presents  itself  as  an  ascending  paralysis (rostro‐caudal), reflecting inflammation localized predominantly in the  spinal  cord.  Variations  from  the  classical  EAE  phenotype  have  also  been  described  (referred  to  as  atypical  or  nonclassical  EAE)  and  have  been  shown  to  occur  in  certain  strain‐  or  antigen  combinations  and  in  mice  deficient  in  interferon  gamma  (IFNγ)  or  its  receptor.  The  clinical  signs  observed  in atypical EAE reflect increased inflammation of the brain stem and cerebellum whereas the  spinal  cord  is  relatively  spared.  Atypical  EAE  represents  an  extension  of  the  classical  EAE  model  since  in  multiple  sclerosis  (MS),  a  human  disease  often  modeled by EAE, inflammatory foci could be found in both the spinal cord and  different brain regions.  Although  no  consensus  exists  on  the  mechanisms  that  lead  to  the  occurrence  of  atypical  EAE,  there  is  an  understanding  that  the  inability  of  the  invading  T  cells  to  produce  IFNγ  leads  to  their  particular  cytokine  and  chemokine  receptor  expression  profile  that  results  in  their  differential  homing  and  a  distinct  pattern  of  tissue  damage  to  the  CNS.  Multiple  studies  have  also  suggested that IL17A is indispensable for the occurrence of atypical EAE.  Our work supports a different view, where the inability of a particular cell  type  (either  of  the  invaded  tissue  or  among  the  invading  cells  themselves)  to  sense  IFNγ  is  the  key  event  that  eventually  leads  to  the  occurrence  of  atypical  EAE.  We  show  that  various  mouse  strains  lacking  IFNγ  or  the  functional  IFNγ  receptor  are  all  susceptible  to  the  induction  of  atypical  EAE  and  IL17A  is  completely  dispensable  for  this  process.  The  disrupted  IFNγ  signaling  in  neutrophils and a subset of myeloid cells alone is sufficient to drive atypical EAE.  The composition of the immune cells infiltrating the CNS is not a determinant of  the  ensuing  clinical  manifestation  of  EAE.  The  development  of  atypical  EAE  in  the  context  of  IFNγ  deficiency  is  not  mediated  by  disrupted  IFNγ  signaling  in  microglia,  as  was  initially  suggested  by  some  authors.  Furthermore,  absence  of  IFNγ  signaling  on  vascular  endothelium  and  presumed  changes  in  the  expression pattern of its adhesion molecules that result from it have no impact on  the  capacity  of  circulating  leukocytes  to  extravasate  and  reach  the  CNS  during  neuroinflammation. Additionally, we were able to show that the inability of the  CNS  tissue  to  respond  to  IFNγ  stimulation  during  neuroinflammation  does  not

Abstract

Experimental  autoimmune  encephalomyelitis  (EAE)  is  a  robust  and  valuable  animal  model  of  autoimmune  inflammation  of  the  central  nervous  system  (CNS).  Clinically,  in  most  rodents,  it  presents  itself  as  an  ascending  paralysis (rostro‐caudal), reflecting inflammation localized predominantly in the  spinal  cord.  Variations  from  the  classical  EAE  phenotype  have  also  been  described  (referred  to  as  atypical  or  nonclassical  EAE)  and  have  been  shown  to  occur  in  certain  strain‐  or  antigen  combinations  and  in  mice  deficient  in  interferon  gamma  (IFNγ)  or  its  receptor.  The  clinical  signs  observed  in atypical EAE reflect increased inflammation of the brain stem and cerebellum whereas the  spinal  cord  is  relatively  spared.  Atypical  EAE  represents  an  extension  of  the  classical  EAE  model  since  in  multiple  sclerosis  (MS),  a  human  disease  often  modeled by EAE, inflammatory foci could be found in both the spinal cord and  different brain regions.  Although  no  consensus  exists  on  the  mechanisms  that  lead  to  the  occurrence  of  atypical  EAE,  there  is  an  understanding  that  the  inability  of  the  invading  T  cells  to  produce  IFNγ  leads  to  their  particular  cytokine  and  chemokine  receptor  expression  profile  that  results  in  their  differential  homing  and  a  distinct  pattern  of  tissue  damage  to  the  CNS.  Multiple  studies  have  also  suggested that IL17A is indispensable for the occurrence of atypical EAE.  Our work supports a different view, where the inability of a particular cell  type  (either  of  the  invaded  tissue  or  among  the  invading  cells  themselves)  to  sense  IFNγ  is  the  key  event  that  eventually  leads  to  the  occurrence  of  atypical  EAE.  We  show  that  various  mouse  strains  lacking  IFNγ  or  the  functional  IFNγ  receptor  are  all  susceptible  to  the  induction  of  atypical  EAE  and  IL17A  is  completely  dispensable  for  this  process.  The  disrupted  IFNγ  signaling  in  neutrophils and a subset of myeloid cells alone is sufficient to drive atypical EAE.  The composition of the immune cells infiltrating the CNS is not a determinant of  the  ensuing  clinical  manifestation  of  EAE.  The  development  of  atypical  EAE  in  the  context  of  IFNγ  deficiency  is  not  mediated  by  disrupted  IFNγ  signaling  in  microglia,  as  was  initially  suggested  by  some  authors.  Furthermore,  absence  of  IFNγ  signaling  on  vascular  endothelium  and  presumed  changes  in  the  expression pattern of its adhesion molecules that result from it have no impact on  the  capacity  of  circulating  leukocytes  to  extravasate  and  reach  the  CNS  during  neuroinflammation. Additionally, we were able to show that the inability of the  CNS  tissue  to  respond  to  IFNγ  stimulation  during  neuroinflammation  does  not

Statistics

Downloads

89 downloads since deposited on 02 Apr 2019
52 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation (monographical)
Referees:Becher Burkhard
Communities & Collections:UZH Dissertations
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:English
Place of Publication:Zürich
Date:2014
Deposited On:02 Apr 2019 14:56
Last Modified:15 Apr 2021 15:01
Number of Pages:80
OA Status:Green

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'The effects of interferon gamma deficiency on the autoimmune inflammation of the central nervous system'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 3MB