Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Chronic rhinosinusitis: pathogenesis, therapy options, and more


Kucuksezer, Umut Can; Ozdemir, Cevdet; Akdis, Mubeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A (2018). Chronic rhinosinusitis: pathogenesis, therapy options, and more. Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy, 19(16):1805-1815.

Abstract

When rhinosinusitis - the inflammation of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses - persists for over 12 weeks, it is termed 'chronic rhinosinusitis' (CRS). Both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to the heterogeneous inflammatory pathogenesis of CRS, which is driven by genetic and environmental factors and the microbiome. CRS is classified by the presence of polyps. Molecular mechanisms in CRS with nasal polyps are similar to those in atopic diseases. Areas covered: This review focuses on the immune pathogenesis of CRS, differences between the two CRS subtypes, and latest treatments that may aid in the provision of personalized medicine. Expert opinion: Basic research in the last decade has helped significantly in enhancing our knowledge of the pathophysiologic processes of CRS, due to which there is now a better understanding of the associated natural history, physiopathology, novel treatments, and prevention strategies. Treatment success depends on the clarification of the underlying pathogenesis and disease-contributing factors. The exploration of disease endotypes and introduction of novel agents are important advancements. Prior studies performed without disease-endotyping resulted in the inefficiency of certain drugs and insignificant results. The identification of biomarkers, development of personalized approaches, and utilization of disease algorithms are required for CRS therapy success.

Abstract

When rhinosinusitis - the inflammation of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses - persists for over 12 weeks, it is termed 'chronic rhinosinusitis' (CRS). Both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to the heterogeneous inflammatory pathogenesis of CRS, which is driven by genetic and environmental factors and the microbiome. CRS is classified by the presence of polyps. Molecular mechanisms in CRS with nasal polyps are similar to those in atopic diseases. Areas covered: This review focuses on the immune pathogenesis of CRS, differences between the two CRS subtypes, and latest treatments that may aid in the provision of personalized medicine. Expert opinion: Basic research in the last decade has helped significantly in enhancing our knowledge of the pathophysiologic processes of CRS, due to which there is now a better understanding of the associated natural history, physiopathology, novel treatments, and prevention strategies. Treatment success depends on the clarification of the underlying pathogenesis and disease-contributing factors. The exploration of disease endotypes and introduction of novel agents are important advancements. Prior studies performed without disease-endotyping resulted in the inefficiency of certain drugs and insignificant results. The identification of biomarkers, development of personalized approaches, and utilization of disease algorithms are required for CRS therapy success.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Pharmacology (medical), Pharmacology, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:2 November 2018
Deposited On:22 Feb 2019 10:34
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:16
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1465-6566
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/14656566.2018.1527904
PubMed ID:30345822

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library