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Effort-Reward Imbalance, Work-Privacy Conflict, and Burnout Among Hospital Employees


Häusler, Nadine; Bopp, Matthias; Hämmig, Oliver (2018). Effort-Reward Imbalance, Work-Privacy Conflict, and Burnout Among Hospital Employees. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 60(4):e183-e187.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE
Studies investigating the relative importance of effort-reward imbalance and work-privacy conflict for burnout risk between professional groups in the health care sector are rare and analyses by educational attainment within professional groups are lacking.
METHODS
The study population consists of 1422 hospital employees in Switzerland. Multivariate linear regression analyses with standardized coefficients were performed for the overall study population and stratified for professional groups refined for educational attainment.
RESULTS
Work-privacy conflict is a strong predictor for burnout and more strongly associated with burnout than effort-reward imbalance in the overall study population and across all professional groups. Effort-reward imbalance only had a minor effect on burnout in tertiary-educated medical professionals.
CONCLUSION
Interventions aiming at increasing the compatibility of work and private life may substantially help to decrease burnout risk of professionals working in a health care setting.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE
Studies investigating the relative importance of effort-reward imbalance and work-privacy conflict for burnout risk between professional groups in the health care sector are rare and analyses by educational attainment within professional groups are lacking.
METHODS
The study population consists of 1422 hospital employees in Switzerland. Multivariate linear regression analyses with standardized coefficients were performed for the overall study population and stratified for professional groups refined for educational attainment.
RESULTS
Work-privacy conflict is a strong predictor for burnout and more strongly associated with burnout than effort-reward imbalance in the overall study population and across all professional groups. Effort-reward imbalance only had a minor effect on burnout in tertiary-educated medical professionals.
CONCLUSION
Interventions aiming at increasing the compatibility of work and private life may substantially help to decrease burnout risk of professionals working in a health care setting.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2018
Deposited On:22 Feb 2019 13:13
Last Modified:01 Apr 2019 00:08
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1076-2752
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000001287
PubMed ID:29370015

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