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Across-night dynamics in traveling sleep slow waves throughout childhood


Schoch, Sarah F; Riedner, Brady A; Deoni, Sean C; Huber, Reto; LeBourgeois, Monique K; Kurth, Salome (2018). Across-night dynamics in traveling sleep slow waves throughout childhood. Sleep, 41(11):zsy165.

Abstract

Study Objectives
Sleep slow waves behave like traveling waves and are thus a marker for brain connectivity. Across a night of sleep in adults, wave propagation is scaled down, becoming more local. Yet, it is unknown whether slow wave propagation undergoes similar across-night dynamics in childhood-a period of extensive cortical rewiring.
Methods
High-density electroencephalography (EEG; 128 channels) was recorded during sleep in three groups of healthy children: 2.0-4.9 years (n = 11), 5.0-8.9 years (n = 9) and 9.0-16.9 years (n = 9). Slow wave propagation speed, distance, and cortical involvement were quantified. To characterize across-night dynamics, the 20% most pronounced (highest amplitude) slow waves were subdivided into five time-based quintiles.
Results
We found indications that slow wave propagation distance decreased across a night of sleep. We observed an interesting interaction of across-night slow wave propagation dynamics with age (p < 0.05). When comparing the first and last quintiles, there was a trend level difference between age groups: 2- to 4.9-year-old children showed an 11.9% across-night decrease in slow wave propagation distance, which was not observed in the older two age groups. Regardless of age, cortical involvement decreased by 10.4%-23.7% across a night of sleep. No across-night changes were observed in slow wave speed.
Conclusions
Findings provide evidence that signatures of brain connectivity undergo across-night dynamics specific to maturational periods. These results suggest that across-night dynamics in slow wave propagation distance reflect heightened plasticity in underlying cerebral networks specific to developmental periods.

Abstract

Study Objectives
Sleep slow waves behave like traveling waves and are thus a marker for brain connectivity. Across a night of sleep in adults, wave propagation is scaled down, becoming more local. Yet, it is unknown whether slow wave propagation undergoes similar across-night dynamics in childhood-a period of extensive cortical rewiring.
Methods
High-density electroencephalography (EEG; 128 channels) was recorded during sleep in three groups of healthy children: 2.0-4.9 years (n = 11), 5.0-8.9 years (n = 9) and 9.0-16.9 years (n = 9). Slow wave propagation speed, distance, and cortical involvement were quantified. To characterize across-night dynamics, the 20% most pronounced (highest amplitude) slow waves were subdivided into five time-based quintiles.
Results
We found indications that slow wave propagation distance decreased across a night of sleep. We observed an interesting interaction of across-night slow wave propagation dynamics with age (p < 0.05). When comparing the first and last quintiles, there was a trend level difference between age groups: 2- to 4.9-year-old children showed an 11.9% across-night decrease in slow wave propagation distance, which was not observed in the older two age groups. Regardless of age, cortical involvement decreased by 10.4%-23.7% across a night of sleep. No across-night changes were observed in slow wave speed.
Conclusions
Findings provide evidence that signatures of brain connectivity undergo across-night dynamics specific to maturational periods. These results suggest that across-night dynamics in slow wave propagation distance reflect heightened plasticity in underlying cerebral networks specific to developmental periods.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 November 2018
Deposited On:22 Feb 2019 13:50
Last Modified:22 Feb 2019 13:52
Publisher:American Academy of Sleep Medicine
ISSN:0161-8105
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsy165
PubMed ID:30169809

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