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Morbidity and Volumetric Progression in Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma in a Long-Term Follow-Up


Mosimann, Marc; Vital, Domenic; Holzmann, David; Epprecht, Lorenz (2018). Morbidity and Volumetric Progression in Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma in a Long-Term Follow-Up. Skull Base, 79(06):533-537.

Abstract

Objective  We compare the open and transnasal approaches for the excision of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas regarding the rate of morbidity, and residual tumor and its symptomatic recurrence over time. In addition, we present volumetric measurements of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas over time. Methods  All surgically treated patients of our institution were reviewed back to 1969 for type of surgery, residual tumor by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based volumetry, recurrence, and morbidity. We performed a prospective clinical and radiological follow-up on reachable patients. Results  In total, 40 patients were retrievable from our records. We were able to follow up on 13 patients after a mean of 15.7 years since surgery (range: 1-47 years). Patients operated by the open approach had a higher rate of postoperative complications and thus a higher morbidity than endoscopic patients (4/4 vs 3/9; p  = 0.007), although tumor sizes were equal among groups ( p  = 0.12). Persisting tumor was noted in 3/4 and 4/9 ( p  = 0.56) patients, respectively. The corresponding mean volumes of residual tumors were 16.2 ± 14.4 cm 3 and 10.8 ± 6.6 cm 3 ( p  = 0.27). No progression could be noted in endoscopically treated patients ( p  = 0.24, mean time between scans 2 years). Conclusions  Our analysis shows that the endoscopic approach results in less morbidity. The open approach does not guarantee freedom from persisting tumor tissue. Age seems to be a most important risk factor for the conversion of an asymptomatic persistence into a symptomatic recurrence.

Abstract

Objective  We compare the open and transnasal approaches for the excision of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas regarding the rate of morbidity, and residual tumor and its symptomatic recurrence over time. In addition, we present volumetric measurements of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas over time. Methods  All surgically treated patients of our institution were reviewed back to 1969 for type of surgery, residual tumor by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based volumetry, recurrence, and morbidity. We performed a prospective clinical and radiological follow-up on reachable patients. Results  In total, 40 patients were retrievable from our records. We were able to follow up on 13 patients after a mean of 15.7 years since surgery (range: 1-47 years). Patients operated by the open approach had a higher rate of postoperative complications and thus a higher morbidity than endoscopic patients (4/4 vs 3/9; p  = 0.007), although tumor sizes were equal among groups ( p  = 0.12). Persisting tumor was noted in 3/4 and 4/9 ( p  = 0.56) patients, respectively. The corresponding mean volumes of residual tumors were 16.2 ± 14.4 cm 3 and 10.8 ± 6.6 cm 3 ( p  = 0.27). No progression could be noted in endoscopically treated patients ( p  = 0.24, mean time between scans 2 years). Conclusions  Our analysis shows that the endoscopic approach results in less morbidity. The open approach does not guarantee freedom from persisting tumor tissue. Age seems to be a most important risk factor for the conversion of an asymptomatic persistence into a symptomatic recurrence.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Clinical Neurology, angiofibroma; endoscopic surgery; follow-up; infratemporal approach; morbidity
Language:English
Date:1 December 2018
Deposited On:27 Feb 2019 13:58
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 09:44
Publisher:Georg Thieme Verlag
ISSN:1531-5010
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0038-1635255
PubMed ID:30456021

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