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Diagnosis of liver flukes in cows--a comparison of the findings in the liver, in the feces, and in the bile.


Braun, Ueli; Wolfensberger, R; Hertzberg, Hubertus (1995). Diagnosis of liver flukes in cows--a comparison of the findings in the liver, in the feces, and in the bile. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 137(9):438-444.

Abstract

Percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis and aspiration of bile were attempted in 176 cows. These same procedures were performed in another 100 cows immediately after slaughter. The bile samples were examined microscopically for large and small liver fluke eggs. In addition, a fecal sample from each cow was examined for liver fluke eggs. The findings of both groups were summarized, and the results of the fecal and bile sample examinations were compared. In all cows the liver was examined for flukes, and the results were used as a reference. Of 41 cows in which adult flukes were found in the liver, 28 had F. hepatica eggs in fecal samples and 40 had F. hepatica eggs in bile samples. Of 204 cows in which no adult flukes were found in the liver, 23 had F. hepatica eggs in fecal samples and 27 had F. hepatica eggs in bile samples. The sensitivity of the determination of F. hepatica eggs in fecal and bile samples was 68 and 98%, respectively. The negative predictive values for fecal and bile examination were 93 and 99%, respectively. Of 49 cows in which adult flukes were observed in the liver, 13 had D. dendriticum eggs in fecal samples and 44 had D. dendriticum eggs in bile samples. Of 176 cows in which no adult flukes were found in the liver, 19 had D. dendriticum eggs in fecal samples and 49 had D. dendriticum eggs in bile samples. The sensitivity of the determination of D. dendriticum eggs in fecal and bile samples was 27 and 90%, respectively. The negative predictive values for fecal and bile examination were 81 and 96%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that the examination of bile is clearly a more reliable method of diagnosing liver fluke infections than microscopic examination of feces.

Abstract

Percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis and aspiration of bile were attempted in 176 cows. These same procedures were performed in another 100 cows immediately after slaughter. The bile samples were examined microscopically for large and small liver fluke eggs. In addition, a fecal sample from each cow was examined for liver fluke eggs. The findings of both groups were summarized, and the results of the fecal and bile sample examinations were compared. In all cows the liver was examined for flukes, and the results were used as a reference. Of 41 cows in which adult flukes were found in the liver, 28 had F. hepatica eggs in fecal samples and 40 had F. hepatica eggs in bile samples. Of 204 cows in which no adult flukes were found in the liver, 23 had F. hepatica eggs in fecal samples and 27 had F. hepatica eggs in bile samples. The sensitivity of the determination of F. hepatica eggs in fecal and bile samples was 68 and 98%, respectively. The negative predictive values for fecal and bile examination were 93 and 99%, respectively. Of 49 cows in which adult flukes were observed in the liver, 13 had D. dendriticum eggs in fecal samples and 44 had D. dendriticum eggs in bile samples. Of 176 cows in which no adult flukes were found in the liver, 19 had D. dendriticum eggs in fecal samples and 49 had D. dendriticum eggs in bile samples. The sensitivity of the determination of D. dendriticum eggs in fecal and bile samples was 27 and 90%, respectively. The negative predictive values for fecal and bile examination were 81 and 96%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that the examination of bile is clearly a more reliable method of diagnosing liver fluke infections than microscopic examination of feces.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology

05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:1995
Deposited On:30 Jan 2019 15:58
Last Modified:30 Jan 2019 15:58
Publisher:Gesellschaft Schweizer Tierärztinnen und Tierärzte
ISSN:0036-7281
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
PubMed ID:7494997

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